A randomized controlled trial to assess the psychosocial effects of early exercise engagement in patients diagnosed with transient ischaemic attack and mild, non-disabling stroke.

James Faulkner, Gerard McGonigal, Brandon Woolley, Lee Stoner, Laikin Wong, Danielle Lambrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effect of an early exercise and education programme on psychosocial health of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and mild, non-disabling stroke patients. Design: Randomized, parallel-group, clinical trial. Setting: Hospital and academic institution. Participants: A total of 55 newly diagnosed transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients (Mean[SD]; 69[11]y). Intervention: Participants were randomized to either an eight-week, twice weekly, 90-minute exercise and education programme (experimental group) or to a usual care control group. Main measures: Psychosocial measures (SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Profile of Mood States, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Stroke Awareness Questionnaire) were assessed at baseline and eight-week and 12-month follow-up. Results: The experimental group demonstrated improvements in the Physical Component Score (Mean[SD]; 44.1[11.7] to 47.4[11.3]%), Vitality (46.5[12.4] to 54.2[14.2]%), Physical Functioning (45.6[10.7] to 51.9[14.7]%), Role Physical (38.7[10.8] to 43.1[13.6]%) and Global Health (49.1[10.3] to 54.4[13.6]%) from the SF-36, at the eight-week follow-up assessment (P < 0.05). There were no further changes in these measures between the eight-week and 12-month follow-up assessment (P > 0.05). The experimental group demonstrated a greater awareness of the signs and symptoms associated with stroke (P < 0.05). There were no differences in the Mental Component Score (SF-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale or the International Physical Activity Questionnaire between treatment groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Early engagement in an exercise and education programme may improve physical health perceptions in transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients. However, secondary prevention exercise and education programmes warrant further research with regards to their effects on perceptions of mental health in this population group.
Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2015

Keywords

  • Transient eschaemic attack
  • Psychosocial health
  • Physical exercise
  • Long-term follow-up

Cite this

@article{d9770d5e5b2941eeaac9bb2d7507f8ca,
title = "A randomized controlled trial to assess the psychosocial effects of early exercise engagement in patients diagnosed with transient ischaemic attack and mild, non-disabling stroke.",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the effect of an early exercise and education programme on psychosocial health of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and mild, non-disabling stroke patients. Design: Randomized, parallel-group, clinical trial. Setting: Hospital and academic institution. Participants: A total of 55 newly diagnosed transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients (Mean[SD]; 69[11]y). Intervention: Participants were randomized to either an eight-week, twice weekly, 90-minute exercise and education programme (experimental group) or to a usual care control group. Main measures: Psychosocial measures (SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Profile of Mood States, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Stroke Awareness Questionnaire) were assessed at baseline and eight-week and 12-month follow-up. Results: The experimental group demonstrated improvements in the Physical Component Score (Mean[SD]; 44.1[11.7] to 47.4[11.3]{\%}), Vitality (46.5[12.4] to 54.2[14.2]{\%}), Physical Functioning (45.6[10.7] to 51.9[14.7]{\%}), Role Physical (38.7[10.8] to 43.1[13.6]{\%}) and Global Health (49.1[10.3] to 54.4[13.6]{\%}) from the SF-36, at the eight-week follow-up assessment (P < 0.05). There were no further changes in these measures between the eight-week and 12-month follow-up assessment (P > 0.05). The experimental group demonstrated a greater awareness of the signs and symptoms associated with stroke (P < 0.05). There were no differences in the Mental Component Score (SF-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale or the International Physical Activity Questionnaire between treatment groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Early engagement in an exercise and education programme may improve physical health perceptions in transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients. However, secondary prevention exercise and education programmes warrant further research with regards to their effects on perceptions of mental health in this population group.",
keywords = "Transient eschaemic attack, Psychosocial health, Physical exercise, Long-term follow-up",
author = "James Faulkner and Gerard McGonigal and Brandon Woolley and Lee Stoner and Laikin Wong and Danielle Lambrick",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0269215514555729",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
journal = "Clinical Rehabilitation",
issn = "0269-2155",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

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A randomized controlled trial to assess the psychosocial effects of early exercise engagement in patients diagnosed with transient ischaemic attack and mild, non-disabling stroke. / Faulkner, James; McGonigal, Gerard; Woolley, Brandon; Stoner, Lee; Wong, Laikin; Lambrick, Danielle.

In: Clinical Rehabilitation, Vol. 29, 01.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized controlled trial to assess the psychosocial effects of early exercise engagement in patients diagnosed with transient ischaemic attack and mild, non-disabling stroke.

AU - Faulkner, James

AU - McGonigal, Gerard

AU - Woolley, Brandon

AU - Stoner, Lee

AU - Wong, Laikin

AU - Lambrick, Danielle

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - Objective: To examine the effect of an early exercise and education programme on psychosocial health of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and mild, non-disabling stroke patients. Design: Randomized, parallel-group, clinical trial. Setting: Hospital and academic institution. Participants: A total of 55 newly diagnosed transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients (Mean[SD]; 69[11]y). Intervention: Participants were randomized to either an eight-week, twice weekly, 90-minute exercise and education programme (experimental group) or to a usual care control group. Main measures: Psychosocial measures (SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Profile of Mood States, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Stroke Awareness Questionnaire) were assessed at baseline and eight-week and 12-month follow-up. Results: The experimental group demonstrated improvements in the Physical Component Score (Mean[SD]; 44.1[11.7] to 47.4[11.3]%), Vitality (46.5[12.4] to 54.2[14.2]%), Physical Functioning (45.6[10.7] to 51.9[14.7]%), Role Physical (38.7[10.8] to 43.1[13.6]%) and Global Health (49.1[10.3] to 54.4[13.6]%) from the SF-36, at the eight-week follow-up assessment (P < 0.05). There were no further changes in these measures between the eight-week and 12-month follow-up assessment (P > 0.05). The experimental group demonstrated a greater awareness of the signs and symptoms associated with stroke (P < 0.05). There were no differences in the Mental Component Score (SF-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale or the International Physical Activity Questionnaire between treatment groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Early engagement in an exercise and education programme may improve physical health perceptions in transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients. However, secondary prevention exercise and education programmes warrant further research with regards to their effects on perceptions of mental health in this population group.

AB - Objective: To examine the effect of an early exercise and education programme on psychosocial health of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and mild, non-disabling stroke patients. Design: Randomized, parallel-group, clinical trial. Setting: Hospital and academic institution. Participants: A total of 55 newly diagnosed transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients (Mean[SD]; 69[11]y). Intervention: Participants were randomized to either an eight-week, twice weekly, 90-minute exercise and education programme (experimental group) or to a usual care control group. Main measures: Psychosocial measures (SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Profile of Mood States, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Stroke Awareness Questionnaire) were assessed at baseline and eight-week and 12-month follow-up. Results: The experimental group demonstrated improvements in the Physical Component Score (Mean[SD]; 44.1[11.7] to 47.4[11.3]%), Vitality (46.5[12.4] to 54.2[14.2]%), Physical Functioning (45.6[10.7] to 51.9[14.7]%), Role Physical (38.7[10.8] to 43.1[13.6]%) and Global Health (49.1[10.3] to 54.4[13.6]%) from the SF-36, at the eight-week follow-up assessment (P < 0.05). There were no further changes in these measures between the eight-week and 12-month follow-up assessment (P > 0.05). The experimental group demonstrated a greater awareness of the signs and symptoms associated with stroke (P < 0.05). There were no differences in the Mental Component Score (SF-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale or the International Physical Activity Questionnaire between treatment groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Early engagement in an exercise and education programme may improve physical health perceptions in transient ischaemic attack/mild stroke patients. However, secondary prevention exercise and education programmes warrant further research with regards to their effects on perceptions of mental health in this population group.

KW - Transient eschaemic attack

KW - Psychosocial health

KW - Physical exercise

KW - Long-term follow-up

U2 - 10.1177/0269215514555729

DO - 10.1177/0269215514555729

M3 - Article

VL - 29

JO - Clinical Rehabilitation

JF - Clinical Rehabilitation

SN - 0269-2155

ER -