Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients

James Faulkner, Lee Stoner, Rebecca Grigg, Simon Fryer, Keeron Stone, Danielle Lambrick

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Abstract

In patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attacks (TIA), a decline in executive function may limit an individual’s ability to process motor tasks and re-learn motor skills. The purpose of this study was to assess the acute effect of exercise posture (seated vs. supine cycle ergometry) on executive function and prefrontal cortex perfusion, in patients with TIA. Eleven TIA patients (65 ± 10y) and 15 age-matched, healthy-controls (HC; 62 ± 7y) completed two exercise tests to maximal capacity (1 x seated; 1 x supine) and two 30-minute sub-maximal exercise tests (1 x seated, 1 x supine). Executive function was assessed prior-to and following (1.5-min Post, 15-min Post) the submaximal exercise tests using a Stroop Task. Prefrontal cortex perfusion (total hemoglobin) was continuously recorded using near infrared spectroscopy. There was no Posture (seated, supine) by Group (TIA, HC) interaction for the Stroop task (p > .05). HC completed Stroop tasks significantly faster than TIA (51.9[10.3] vs. 64.2[8.5] s, respectively); while Stroop completion time significantly improved between Baseline and 1.5-min Post (61.3[10] vs. 58.1[9.4] s, respectively) and 1.5-min Post and 15-min Post (54.8[8.9] s). Posture and Group had no significant influence on prefrontal cortex perfusion (p > .05). In conclusion, executive function improves to a similar extent in TIA and age-matched, healthy-controls following an acute bout of exercise, regardless of exercise posture. As acute improvements in executive function were maintained for 15 minutes, there could be an important window of opportunity for assigning executive tasks following exercise rehabilitation for patients with TIA.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychophysiology
Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • stroke, cerebral perfusion, cognition, prefrontal cortex, supine, cycling

Cite this

Faulkner, J., Stoner, L., Grigg, R., Fryer, S., Stone, K., & Lambrick, D. (2017). Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients. Psychophysiology.
Faulkner, James ; Stoner, Lee ; Grigg, Rebecca ; Fryer, Simon ; Stone, Keeron ; Lambrick, Danielle. / Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients. In: Psychophysiology. 2017.
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Faulkner, J, Stoner, L, Grigg, R, Fryer, S, Stone, K & Lambrick, D 2017, 'Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients', Psychophysiology.

Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients. / Faulkner, James; Stoner, Lee; Grigg, Rebecca; Fryer, Simon; Stone, Keeron; Lambrick, Danielle.

In: Psychophysiology, 08.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients

AU - Faulkner, James

AU - Stoner, Lee

AU - Grigg, Rebecca

AU - Fryer, Simon

AU - Stone, Keeron

AU - Lambrick, Danielle

PY - 2017/3/8

Y1 - 2017/3/8

N2 - In patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attacks (TIA), a decline in executive function may limit an individual’s ability to process motor tasks and re-learn motor skills. The purpose of this study was to assess the acute effect of exercise posture (seated vs. supine cycle ergometry) on executive function and prefrontal cortex perfusion, in patients with TIA. Eleven TIA patients (65 ± 10y) and 15 age-matched, healthy-controls (HC; 62 ± 7y) completed two exercise tests to maximal capacity (1 x seated; 1 x supine) and two 30-minute sub-maximal exercise tests (1 x seated, 1 x supine). Executive function was assessed prior-to and following (1.5-min Post, 15-min Post) the submaximal exercise tests using a Stroop Task. Prefrontal cortex perfusion (total hemoglobin) was continuously recorded using near infrared spectroscopy. There was no Posture (seated, supine) by Group (TIA, HC) interaction for the Stroop task (p > .05). HC completed Stroop tasks significantly faster than TIA (51.9[10.3] vs. 64.2[8.5] s, respectively); while Stroop completion time significantly improved between Baseline and 1.5-min Post (61.3[10] vs. 58.1[9.4] s, respectively) and 1.5-min Post and 15-min Post (54.8[8.9] s). Posture and Group had no significant influence on prefrontal cortex perfusion (p > .05). In conclusion, executive function improves to a similar extent in TIA and age-matched, healthy-controls following an acute bout of exercise, regardless of exercise posture. As acute improvements in executive function were maintained for 15 minutes, there could be an important window of opportunity for assigning executive tasks following exercise rehabilitation for patients with TIA.

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KW - stroke, cerebral perfusion, cognition, prefrontal cortex, supine, cycling

M3 - Article

ER -

Faulkner J, Stoner L, Grigg R, Fryer S, Stone K, Lambrick D. Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients. Psychophysiology. 2017 Mar 8.