Adolescent Masculinity in an age of Decreased Homohysteria.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Adolescent masculinity in the 1980s was marked by the need to distance oneself from the specter of ‘the fag.’ In this homohysteric culture, compulsory heterosexuality and high rates of anti-gay sentiment necessitated that adolescent boys distance themselves from anything associated with femininity. It was this zeitgeist that brought Connell’s hegemonic masculinity theory to the vanguard of masculine studies. However, homohysteria has diminished among adolescents today. Accordingly, in this article, I foreground research extracts from multiple ethnographies on groups of 16-year-old adolescent boys in order to contextualize the repeated and consistent data I find throughout both the United States and the United Kingdom. In explaining how the diminishment of homohysteria promotes a ‘One-Direction’ culture of inclusive and highly feminized masculinities, I suggest that new social theories are required.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-93
JournalBoyhood Studies
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Homohysteria
  • Inclusive masculinities
  • Homophobia
  • Masculinity
  • Adolescence

Cite this

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Adolescent Masculinity in an age of Decreased Homohysteria. / Anderson, Eric.

Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.03.2013, p. 79-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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