Afterword: Playing, winning and losing the Game of Thrones: Reflections on female succession in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones in comparison to the premodern era

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter draws connections between the chapters in this collection, the female characters of A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones and historical examples from the premodern era. It looks specifically at female succession and examines the development of frameworks for accession which favoured male claimants in both the premodern era and in Westeros. It notes the ways in which Cersei Lannister, Danerys Targayen, Yara (Asha) Greyjoy and Sansa Stark both reflect and transgress historical examples of female succession as unique blends of inspiration from the past rather than a duplication of the experience of any specific premodern queen.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationQueenship and the Women of Westeros: Female Agency and Advice in Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire
EditorsLisa Benz, Zita Rohr
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • queenship
  • succession
  • Game of Thrones

Cite this

Woodacre, E. (Accepted/In press). Afterword: Playing, winning and losing the Game of Thrones: Reflections on female succession in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones in comparison to the premodern era. In L. Benz, & Z. Rohr (Eds.), Queenship and the Women of Westeros: Female Agency and Advice in Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire