Age and gender effects on perceptual colour scaling using triadic comparisons

David Bimler, Valerie Bonnardel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

We examined age and gender as possible determinants of individual differences in triadic judgments of color dissimilarity. Seventy triads wereconstructed from 21 equal-lightness Munsell samples, at equal hue steps, forming a rough ellipse in the CIE-LAB plane, and presented to 51 males and 53 females (half young, half elderly adults) who indicated each triad’s “odd-one-out”. Principal Components Analysis, followed by MDS, revealedgroup differences in judgment reliability, with better performance for female and younger groups. Gender differences in color similarity were morepronounced with age, and specific to sectors of the color circle, arguably involving the use of conventional knowledge of color relationships.Maximum-Likelihood MDS and inspection of specific triads allowed a more detailed description of these differences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)B1-B10
JournalJournal of Optical Society of America A
Volume35
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Colour
  • colour vision
  • visual optics
  • gender
  • colour perception

Cite this

Bimler, D., & Bonnardel, V. (2017). Age and gender effects on perceptual colour scaling using triadic comparisons. Journal of Optical Society of America A, 35(4), B1-B10.
Bimler, David ; Bonnardel, Valerie. / Age and gender effects on perceptual colour scaling using triadic comparisons. In: Journal of Optical Society of America A. 2017 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. B1-B10.
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Bimler, D & Bonnardel, V 2017, 'Age and gender effects on perceptual colour scaling using triadic comparisons', Journal of Optical Society of America A, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. B1-B10.

Age and gender effects on perceptual colour scaling using triadic comparisons. / Bimler, David; Bonnardel, Valerie.

In: Journal of Optical Society of America A, Vol. 35, No. 4, 20.12.2017, p. B1-B10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Age and gender effects on perceptual colour scaling using triadic comparisons

AU - Bimler, David

AU - Bonnardel, Valerie

PY - 2017/12/20

Y1 - 2017/12/20

N2 - We examined age and gender as possible determinants of individual differences in triadic judgments of color dissimilarity. Seventy triads wereconstructed from 21 equal-lightness Munsell samples, at equal hue steps, forming a rough ellipse in the CIE-LAB plane, and presented to 51 males and 53 females (half young, half elderly adults) who indicated each triad’s “odd-one-out”. Principal Components Analysis, followed by MDS, revealedgroup differences in judgment reliability, with better performance for female and younger groups. Gender differences in color similarity were morepronounced with age, and specific to sectors of the color circle, arguably involving the use of conventional knowledge of color relationships.Maximum-Likelihood MDS and inspection of specific triads allowed a more detailed description of these differences.

AB - We examined age and gender as possible determinants of individual differences in triadic judgments of color dissimilarity. Seventy triads wereconstructed from 21 equal-lightness Munsell samples, at equal hue steps, forming a rough ellipse in the CIE-LAB plane, and presented to 51 males and 53 females (half young, half elderly adults) who indicated each triad’s “odd-one-out”. Principal Components Analysis, followed by MDS, revealedgroup differences in judgment reliability, with better performance for female and younger groups. Gender differences in color similarity were morepronounced with age, and specific to sectors of the color circle, arguably involving the use of conventional knowledge of color relationships.Maximum-Likelihood MDS and inspection of specific triads allowed a more detailed description of these differences.

KW - Colour

KW - colour vision

KW - visual optics

KW - gender

KW - colour perception

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Bimler D, Bonnardel V. Age and gender effects on perceptual colour scaling using triadic comparisons. Journal of Optical Society of America A. 2017 Dec 20;35(4):B1-B10.