Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults?

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: This study aims to replicate a laboratory experiment that originally found those wearing a bicycle helmet rather than a baseball cap scored higher on both a risk-taking task and sensation-seeking measure. This replication will control for experimenter effects.
Background: The original study received much press attention and has been cited as an example for not placing too much faith in bicycle helmets as a solution for cyclist safety. Of particular interest was that the risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviour measured in the laboratory was not directly related to the protective health and safety benefits of wearing a helmet. Recent criticism questions whether the findings were an artefact of failing to employ a double-blind methodology; could the experimenters, who were aware of the purpose of the study, have conveyed their expectations to the participants?
Methods: The original study employed an independent-samples design: participants wore either a bicycle helmet or a baseball cap. Whilst participants were blind to the purpose of the study, the experimenters were not. The revised methodology will be double-blind; ways of achieving this will be discussed.
Conclusions: If the original findings are replicated then there are implications for the wearing of personal health protective equipment if increased generally risky decisions are made that are not related to their protective capabilities. However, if the original findings do not replicate, then this is a lesson on the folly in placing too much faith in the results of a single nonreplicated study, along with the importance of employing a double-blind methodology.
LanguageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sep 2018
EventBritish Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference: Celebrating Health Psychology - Newcastle, United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Sep 20187 Sep 2018

Conference

ConferenceBritish Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period5/09/187/09/18

Cite this

Gamble, T., Randell, J., & Wood, M. (2018). Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults?. Poster session presented at British Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, United Kingdom.
Gamble, Tim ; Randell, Jordan ; Wood, Michael. / Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults?. Poster session presented at British Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, United Kingdom.
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title = "Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults?",
abstract = "Purpose: This study aims to replicate a laboratory experiment that originally found those wearing a bicycle helmet rather than a baseball cap scored higher on both a risk-taking task and sensation-seeking measure. This replication will control for experimenter effects.Background: The original study received much press attention and has been cited as an example for not placing too much faith in bicycle helmets as a solution for cyclist safety. Of particular interest was that the risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviour measured in the laboratory was not directly related to the protective health and safety benefits of wearing a helmet. Recent criticism questions whether the findings were an artefact of failing to employ a double-blind methodology; could the experimenters, who were aware of the purpose of the study, have conveyed their expectations to the participants?Methods: The original study employed an independent-samples design: participants wore either a bicycle helmet or a baseball cap. Whilst participants were blind to the purpose of the study, the experimenters were not. The revised methodology will be double-blind; ways of achieving this will be discussed.Conclusions: If the original findings are replicated then there are implications for the wearing of personal health protective equipment if increased generally risky decisions are made that are not related to their protective capabilities. However, if the original findings do not replicate, then this is a lesson on the folly in placing too much faith in the results of a single nonreplicated study, along with the importance of employing a double-blind methodology.",
author = "Tim Gamble and Jordan Randell and Michael Wood",
year = "2018",
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note = "British Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference : Celebrating Health Psychology ; Conference date: 05-09-2018 Through 07-09-2018",

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Gamble, T, Randell, J & Wood, M 2018, 'Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults?' British Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, United Kingdom, 5/09/18 - 7/09/18, .

Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults? / Gamble, Tim; Randell, Jordan; Wood, Michael.

2018. Poster session presented at British Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults?

AU - Gamble, Tim

AU - Randell, Jordan

AU - Wood, Michael

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N2 - Purpose: This study aims to replicate a laboratory experiment that originally found those wearing a bicycle helmet rather than a baseball cap scored higher on both a risk-taking task and sensation-seeking measure. This replication will control for experimenter effects.Background: The original study received much press attention and has been cited as an example for not placing too much faith in bicycle helmets as a solution for cyclist safety. Of particular interest was that the risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviour measured in the laboratory was not directly related to the protective health and safety benefits of wearing a helmet. Recent criticism questions whether the findings were an artefact of failing to employ a double-blind methodology; could the experimenters, who were aware of the purpose of the study, have conveyed their expectations to the participants?Methods: The original study employed an independent-samples design: participants wore either a bicycle helmet or a baseball cap. Whilst participants were blind to the purpose of the study, the experimenters were not. The revised methodology will be double-blind; ways of achieving this will be discussed.Conclusions: If the original findings are replicated then there are implications for the wearing of personal health protective equipment if increased generally risky decisions are made that are not related to their protective capabilities. However, if the original findings do not replicate, then this is a lesson on the folly in placing too much faith in the results of a single nonreplicated study, along with the importance of employing a double-blind methodology.

AB - Purpose: This study aims to replicate a laboratory experiment that originally found those wearing a bicycle helmet rather than a baseball cap scored higher on both a risk-taking task and sensation-seeking measure. This replication will control for experimenter effects.Background: The original study received much press attention and has been cited as an example for not placing too much faith in bicycle helmets as a solution for cyclist safety. Of particular interest was that the risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviour measured in the laboratory was not directly related to the protective health and safety benefits of wearing a helmet. Recent criticism questions whether the findings were an artefact of failing to employ a double-blind methodology; could the experimenters, who were aware of the purpose of the study, have conveyed their expectations to the participants?Methods: The original study employed an independent-samples design: participants wore either a bicycle helmet or a baseball cap. Whilst participants were blind to the purpose of the study, the experimenters were not. The revised methodology will be double-blind; ways of achieving this will be discussed.Conclusions: If the original findings are replicated then there are implications for the wearing of personal health protective equipment if increased generally risky decisions are made that are not related to their protective capabilities. However, if the original findings do not replicate, then this is a lesson on the folly in placing too much faith in the results of a single nonreplicated study, along with the importance of employing a double-blind methodology.

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Gamble T, Randell J, Wood M. Can wearing a bicycle helmet really increase risk taking and sensation seeking in adults?. 2018. Poster session presented at British Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, United Kingdom.