COLONIAL, POPULAR, AND SCIENTIFIC? The Exposition du Sahara (1934) and the Formation of the Musée de l’Homme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article explores the collection and exhibition practices surrounding the Exposition du Sahara (1934), an exhibit organized at a key moment in the transformation of the Musée d’Ethnographie du Trocadéro into France’s modernized anthropological museum, the Musée de l’Homme. Through an analysis of archival material and exhibit publications, the article traces how the institutionalization of ethnographic collecting practices was shaped by interactions between museum personnel and collectors on the ground, and by the organizers’ desire to make the Exposition du Sahara, and the Musée d’Ethnographie itself, simultaneously scientific, popular, and a successful colonial institution. The account also tells the story of some of the objects from North Africa now housed at the Musée du Quai Branly, where very different modes of interpretation have been applied.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMuseum Anthropology
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 14 Jul 2019

Keywords

  • Musée de l’Homme
  • Musée d’Ethnographie du Trocadéro
  • colonial collections
  • North Africa
  • Sahara

Cite this

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title = "COLONIAL, POPULAR, AND SCIENTIFIC? The Exposition du Sahara (1934) and the Formation of the Mus{\'e}e de l’Homme",
abstract = "This article explores the collection and exhibition practices surrounding the Exposition du Sahara (1934), an exhibit organized at a key moment in the transformation of the Mus{\'e}e d’Ethnographie du Trocad{\'e}ro into France’s modernized anthropological museum, the Mus{\'e}e de l’Homme. Through an analysis of archival material and exhibit publications, the article traces how the institutionalization of ethnographic collecting practices was shaped by interactions between museum personnel and collectors on the ground, and by the organizers’ desire to make the Exposition du Sahara, and the Mus{\'e}e d’Ethnographie itself, simultaneously scientific, popular, and a successful colonial institution. The account also tells the story of some of the objects from North Africa now housed at the Mus{\'e}e du Quai Branly, where very different modes of interpretation have been applied.",
keywords = "Mus{\'e}e de l’Homme, Mus{\'e}e d’Ethnographie du Trocad{\'e}ro, colonial collections, North Africa, Sahara",
author = "Lisa Bernasek",
year = "2019",
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day = "14",
language = "English",
journal = "Museum Anthropology",
issn = "0892-8339",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

COLONIAL, POPULAR, AND SCIENTIFIC? The Exposition du Sahara (1934) and the Formation of the Musée de l’Homme. / Bernasek, Lisa.

In: Museum Anthropology, 14.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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