Creative Judgment and the issues of writing young adult fiction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Philip Pullman suggests that there is no subject too big for children’s literature, while Melvin Burgess contends that young adults can deal with any issue if it is placed in context. As a writer of young adult fiction that often contains contentious subjects such as sex, drugs and alcohol, I am conscious that applying creative judgment is a vital part of my writing process. As an author I have an element of responsibility. This article first considers the relevance of the story with particular emphasis on the vicarious experience and why this is so important for the young adult reader. It then explores my own creative processes and how I make these creative judgments.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4
JournalAxon
Volume1
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • creative judgmen
  • young adult fiction
  • contentious issues
  • young adult
  • writing

Cite this

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issn = "1838-8973",
publisher = "Faculty of Arts and Design, University of Canberra",
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Creative Judgment and the issues of writing young adult fiction. / Harbour, Vanessa.

In: Axon, Vol. 1, No. 2, 4, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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