Developing internationalisation strategies, University of Winchester, UK

Richard Neale, Alasdair Spark, Joy Carter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Internationalisation has been a theme in UK higher education for a decade or more. The review of this paper, a practice-based case study, is to find how Winchester formulated two successive internationalisation strategies. Design/methodology/approach: The strategies were developed using a research-oriented method: grounded in the literature and an institutional development model, the work included a comprehensive survey of the university’s existing international engagement, two rounds of structured discussions with senior staff, and a formal organisational development process. Findings: The survey of the university’s international engagement was a most useful exercise. It revealed a substantial and diverse range of engagement which provided confidence that the aim to be a “fully internationalised university” was realistic. There was general agreement that Winchester must demonstrate strong levels of engagement through five strategic priorities related to: curriculum and student mobility; European Union/international staff and students; collaboration with international organisations; academic and social integration of students and staff; coordination of practices and processes. Research limitations/implications: This is a case study of one UK university. Practical implications: The process by which the strategies were developed should be relevant to other universities. Social implications: Winchester is “Values Driven University”: “We value freedom, justice, truth, human rights and collective effort for the common good”. Internationalisation is consistent with these values, fostering an understanding of diverse cultures and an awareness of global issues. Originality/value: The authors found no published work describing such a structured and participative process for developing internationalisation strategies within a university.

LanguageEnglish
Pages171-184
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Educational Management
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Developing Internationalisation Strategies
  • Participative Methodology
  • Case Study
  • University Winchester
  • United Kingdom
  • Participative
  • Methodology
  • Strategies
  • Developing
  • Internationalization

Cite this

Neale, Richard ; Spark, Alasdair ; Carter, Joy. / Developing internationalisation strategies, University of Winchester, UK. 2018 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 171-184.
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Developing internationalisation strategies, University of Winchester, UK. / Neale, Richard; Spark, Alasdair; Carter, Joy.

Vol. 32, No. 1, 23.01.2018, p. 171-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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