Extended primary care

Potential learning from Italy

Geoffrey Meads

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Health systems across Europe are under increasing pressure to shift care outside of hospitals and into community settings. The emphasis is on providing high quality, coordinated care for a growing population of older patients and those with long term conditions. Extended primary care is regarded as key means of achieving such a shift. We report learning following exploratory visits to two sites in Italy, each providing an example of a primary care organisation with extended general practices, community health and local resource utilisation responsibilities. We draw out three areas of potential interest - shifting care from hospital to community settings, facilitating localism, and enabling stable leadership – all of which appear to provide a means for local clinicians, managers and their communities to commission care according to local needs. We conclude by recommending that primary care researchers consider undertaking further work in Italy, building on this exploratory work and more systematically exploring the effects of such programmes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
JournalPrimary Health Care Research and Development
Volume4
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2012

Keywords

  • Italy
  • Extended primary care
  • Exploratory visits

Cite this

Meads, G. (2012). Extended primary care: Potential learning from Italy. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 4(13), 1-5. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423612000011
Meads, Geoffrey. / Extended primary care : Potential learning from Italy. In: Primary Health Care Research and Development. 2012 ; Vol. 4, No. 13. pp. 1-5.
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Meads, G 2012, 'Extended primary care: Potential learning from Italy', Primary Health Care Research and Development, vol. 4, no. 13, pp. 1-5. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423612000011

Extended primary care : Potential learning from Italy. / Meads, Geoffrey.

In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, Vol. 4, No. 13, 01.02.2012, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Meads G. Extended primary care: Potential learning from Italy. Primary Health Care Research and Development. 2012 Feb 1;4(13):1-5. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423612000011