From Philos Hispaniae to Karl Marx: the first English translation of a Liberal Codex

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This is a study of the authorship, text and impact of the first full English translation of the Constitución Política de la Monarquía Española, known as the Constitution of Cadiz, also the first – in this case, last as well – constitution of the global Hispanic world. The unveiling of the identity of Philos Hispaniae, the man behind its dissemination in London makes possible the exploration of the political, economic and cultural disruptions which, it is argued, explain the translator´s editorial approach. A historical analysis reveals significant mismatches in the translation of Spanish terms into English notions of imperial governance. The chapter ends with an appraisal of the influence this edition had on future generations of readers, including theorists such as Karl Marx.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTranslations in times of disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts
EditorsGraciela Iglesias-Rogers, David Hook
Place of PublicationBasingstoke
Chapter3
Pages45-73
Number of pages315
ISBN (Electronic)10.1057/978-1-137-58334-5_3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Cite this

Iglesias Rogers, G. (2017). From Philos Hispaniae to Karl Marx: the first English translation of a Liberal Codex. In G. Iglesias-Rogers, & D. Hook (Eds.), Translations in times of disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts (pp. 45-73). Basingstoke. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-58334-5_3
Iglesias Rogers, Graciela. / From Philos Hispaniae to Karl Marx: the first English translation of a Liberal Codex. Translations in times of disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts. editor / Graciela Iglesias-Rogers ; David Hook. Basingstoke, 2017. pp. 45-73
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Iglesias Rogers, G 2017, From Philos Hispaniae to Karl Marx: the first English translation of a Liberal Codex. in G Iglesias-Rogers & D Hook (eds), Translations in times of disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts. Basingstoke, pp. 45-73. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-58334-5_3

From Philos Hispaniae to Karl Marx: the first English translation of a Liberal Codex. / Iglesias Rogers, Graciela.

Translations in times of disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts. ed. / Graciela Iglesias-Rogers; David Hook. Basingstoke, 2017. p. 45-73.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Iglesias Rogers G. From Philos Hispaniae to Karl Marx: the first English translation of a Liberal Codex. In Iglesias-Rogers G, Hook D, editors, Translations in times of disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts. Basingstoke. 2017. p. 45-73 https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-58334-5_3