Howard Caygill on resistance: ecce homo

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Abstract

Howard Caygill’s On Resistance (2013) is changing the landscape of how the concept of resistance is understood. In his book, he theorises a concept of resistance rooted in the Kantian aporia of judgement, in the Hegelian notion of Force, in Clausewitz’s idea of resistance as a capacity and in the Nietzschean notion of affirmation. He employs these against philosophies of dialectic and resolution. I trace these themes back through some of his earlier work, to reveal the tensions that persist in his own thinking, and which underpin the puzzles, the aporias, that are central to his notion of resistance. I argue that in his earlier work a notion of (Hegelian) philosophical education receives more generous treatment. By retrieving this notion of learning and locating it within On Resistance, we can get closer not only to the relationship between actuality, possibility and necessity, that are so important to Caygill’s notion of resistance, but also to the philosophical character of the man Caygill: ecce homo.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-383
JournalJournal for Cultural Research
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Sep 2014

Keywords

  • Caygill
  • resistance
  • aporia
  • Hegel
  • education

Cite this

Tubbs, Nigel. / Howard Caygill on resistance: ecce homo. In: Journal for Cultural Research. 2014 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 370-383.
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Tubbs, N 2014, 'Howard Caygill on resistance: ecce homo', Journal for Cultural Research, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 370-383. https://doi.org/10.1080/14797585.2014.959310

Howard Caygill on resistance: ecce homo. / Tubbs, Nigel.

In: Journal for Cultural Research, Vol. 18, No. 4, 23.09.2014, p. 370-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Tubbs N. Howard Caygill on resistance: ecce homo. Journal for Cultural Research. 2014 Sep 23;18(4):370-383. https://doi.org/10.1080/14797585.2014.959310