It’s Good To Talk: Sport and Exercise Psychology Conversations.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Many sport psychology consultants (SPC) spend time providing support to individuals from the confines of an office or a spare room at a training venue. Sometimes we might be brought into a club environment to deliver a series of workshops. Either way, we are often operating in a very formal, rigid domain, detached from the reality of the competitive environment within which our clients perform. Instead, they are bought into our comfort zone; a place where we know the territory and explore their world at a distance, ensconced in our own safety net and confident in our abilities to deliver interventions that will enable them to perform at their potential. The shift for the SPC from operating in this way to travelling and working in a high-level competition environment can therefore be wrought with challenges; not least your own anxieties about
how to operate differently in what can be unfamiliar territory. What follows is a dialogue between three applied SPCs who have varied levels of experience at operating at International competitions within the sports of archery and cricket.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2
Pages (from-to)85-92
Number of pages7
JournalSport and Exercise Psychology Review
Volume9
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Applied practice
  • Sport psychology consulting

Cite this

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title = "It’s Good To Talk: Sport and Exercise Psychology Conversations.",
abstract = "Many sport psychology consultants (SPC) spend time providing support to individuals from the confines of an office or a spare room at a training venue. Sometimes we might be brought into a club environment to deliver a series of workshops. Either way, we are often operating in a very formal, rigid domain, detached from the reality of the competitive environment within which our clients perform. Instead, they are bought into our comfort zone; a place where we know the territory and explore their world at a distance, ensconced in our own safety net and confident in our abilities to deliver interventions that will enable them to perform at their potential. The shift for the SPC from operating in this way to travelling and working in a high-level competition environment can therefore be wrought with challenges; not least your own anxieties abouthow to operate differently in what can be unfamiliar territory. What follows is a dialogue between three applied SPCs who have varied levels of experience at operating at International competitions within the sports of archery and cricket.",
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It’s Good To Talk: Sport and Exercise Psychology Conversations. / Batey, Joanne; Sporting Success ; Cotterill, Stewart.

Vol. 9, No. 2, 2, 2013, p. 85-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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