Oscillometric central blood pressure and central systolic loading in stroke patients

Short-term reproducibility and effects of posture and fasting state

Andrew Mitchelmore, Lee Stoner, Danielle Lambrick, Lucy Sykes, Charlotte Eglinton, Simon Jobson, James Faulkner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study examined the short-term reproducibility of non-invasive estimates of central and peripheral blood pressure and markers of central systolic loading (augmentation index [AIx; a measure of central systolic loading] and AIx75 [AIx standardised to 75 b·min-1 heart rate]) and the effect of posture and fasting state on these variables in patients with acute stroke. METHODS: Twenty-two acute stroke patients (72 ± 10y) had blood pressure measured using the SphygmoCor XCEL in supine and seated postures and whilst fasted and non-fasted. RESULTS: Acceptable short-term reproducibility (ICC >0.75) was reported for all peripheral and central variables in all conditions (ICC = 0.77–0.90) and for AIx and AIx75 in both fasted postures (ICC = 0.78–0.81). Food consumption significantly lowered all blood pressures (p <0.05; η2p = 0.20–0.55). The seated posture resulted in a significantly greater AIx than supine (p <0.05; η2p = 0.22). Fasting state had significant main effects on AIx and AIx75 (p <0.05; η2p = 0.14–0.22). CONCLUSIONS: Oscillometric estimates of central blood pressure have high short-term reproducibility in different postures and fasting states but markers of systolic load should be assessed whilst fasted. Fasting state has a large effect on central and peripheral blood pressures and on measures of systolic loading. It is important for clinicians to be aware of optimal assessment conditions without this impacting on patient wellbeing.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS ONE
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Augmentation index
  • Pulse wave analysis
  • Central Haemodynamics
  • SphygmoCorXL

Cite this

@article{71dbe1c8d4d648db932a9decc02335bb,
title = "Oscillometric central blood pressure and central systolic loading in stroke patients: Short-term reproducibility and effects of posture and fasting state",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: This study examined the short-term reproducibility of non-invasive estimates of central and peripheral blood pressure and markers of central systolic loading (augmentation index [AIx; a measure of central systolic loading] and AIx75 [AIx standardised to 75 b·min-1 heart rate]) and the effect of posture and fasting state on these variables in patients with acute stroke. METHODS: Twenty-two acute stroke patients (72 ± 10y) had blood pressure measured using the SphygmoCor XCEL in supine and seated postures and whilst fasted and non-fasted. RESULTS: Acceptable short-term reproducibility (ICC >0.75) was reported for all peripheral and central variables in all conditions (ICC = 0.77–0.90) and for AIx and AIx75 in both fasted postures (ICC = 0.78–0.81). Food consumption significantly lowered all blood pressures (p <0.05; η2p = 0.20–0.55). The seated posture resulted in a significantly greater AIx than supine (p <0.05; η2p = 0.22). Fasting state had significant main effects on AIx and AIx75 (p <0.05; η2p = 0.14–0.22). CONCLUSIONS: Oscillometric estimates of central blood pressure have high short-term reproducibility in different postures and fasting states but markers of systolic load should be assessed whilst fasted. Fasting state has a large effect on central and peripheral blood pressures and on measures of systolic loading. It is important for clinicians to be aware of optimal assessment conditions without this impacting on patient wellbeing.",
keywords = "Augmentation index, Pulse wave analysis, Central Haemodynamics, SphygmoCorXL",
author = "Andrew Mitchelmore and Lee Stoner and Danielle Lambrick and Lucy Sykes and Charlotte Eglinton and Simon Jobson and James Faulkner",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
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Oscillometric central blood pressure and central systolic loading in stroke patients : Short-term reproducibility and effects of posture and fasting state. / Mitchelmore, Andrew; Stoner, Lee; Lambrick, Danielle; Sykes, Lucy; Eglinton, Charlotte; Jobson, Simon; Faulkner, James.

In: PLoS ONE, 01.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oscillometric central blood pressure and central systolic loading in stroke patients

T2 - Short-term reproducibility and effects of posture and fasting state

AU - Mitchelmore, Andrew

AU - Stoner, Lee

AU - Lambrick, Danielle

AU - Sykes, Lucy

AU - Eglinton, Charlotte

AU - Jobson, Simon

AU - Faulkner, James

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: This study examined the short-term reproducibility of non-invasive estimates of central and peripheral blood pressure and markers of central systolic loading (augmentation index [AIx; a measure of central systolic loading] and AIx75 [AIx standardised to 75 b·min-1 heart rate]) and the effect of posture and fasting state on these variables in patients with acute stroke. METHODS: Twenty-two acute stroke patients (72 ± 10y) had blood pressure measured using the SphygmoCor XCEL in supine and seated postures and whilst fasted and non-fasted. RESULTS: Acceptable short-term reproducibility (ICC >0.75) was reported for all peripheral and central variables in all conditions (ICC = 0.77–0.90) and for AIx and AIx75 in both fasted postures (ICC = 0.78–0.81). Food consumption significantly lowered all blood pressures (p <0.05; η2p = 0.20–0.55). The seated posture resulted in a significantly greater AIx than supine (p <0.05; η2p = 0.22). Fasting state had significant main effects on AIx and AIx75 (p <0.05; η2p = 0.14–0.22). CONCLUSIONS: Oscillometric estimates of central blood pressure have high short-term reproducibility in different postures and fasting states but markers of systolic load should be assessed whilst fasted. Fasting state has a large effect on central and peripheral blood pressures and on measures of systolic loading. It is important for clinicians to be aware of optimal assessment conditions without this impacting on patient wellbeing.

AB - BACKGROUND: This study examined the short-term reproducibility of non-invasive estimates of central and peripheral blood pressure and markers of central systolic loading (augmentation index [AIx; a measure of central systolic loading] and AIx75 [AIx standardised to 75 b·min-1 heart rate]) and the effect of posture and fasting state on these variables in patients with acute stroke. METHODS: Twenty-two acute stroke patients (72 ± 10y) had blood pressure measured using the SphygmoCor XCEL in supine and seated postures and whilst fasted and non-fasted. RESULTS: Acceptable short-term reproducibility (ICC >0.75) was reported for all peripheral and central variables in all conditions (ICC = 0.77–0.90) and for AIx and AIx75 in both fasted postures (ICC = 0.78–0.81). Food consumption significantly lowered all blood pressures (p <0.05; η2p = 0.20–0.55). The seated posture resulted in a significantly greater AIx than supine (p <0.05; η2p = 0.22). Fasting state had significant main effects on AIx and AIx75 (p <0.05; η2p = 0.14–0.22). CONCLUSIONS: Oscillometric estimates of central blood pressure have high short-term reproducibility in different postures and fasting states but markers of systolic load should be assessed whilst fasted. Fasting state has a large effect on central and peripheral blood pressures and on measures of systolic loading. It is important for clinicians to be aware of optimal assessment conditions without this impacting on patient wellbeing.

KW - Augmentation index

KW - Pulse wave analysis

KW - Central Haemodynamics

KW - SphygmoCorXL

M3 - Article

ER -