Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language

Clare Davies, Thora Tenbrink

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

How do people refer to places in their environment, and to what extent do the underlying spatial concepts correspond to officially defined regions? We exemplify some types of evidence that may help to determine local vernacular place concepts. The output of LSA on a web-scraped text corpus was compared with mapping and linguistic data from a pilot experiment, to see how localities within the same geographic area tended to be clustered, how far the spatial geog-raphy is similarly distorted, and how far participants’ verbal protocols revealed a tendency to group places together (and how). Finally, we list some challenges for future triangulation of such data sources, in deriving vernacular place data.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017)
ISBN (Electronic)9783319639468
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Place
  • Vernacular geography
  • Latent semantic analysis (LSA)
  • Spatial cognition
  • Spatial language
  • Regions
  • Categorical reasoning

Cite this

Davies, C., & Tenbrink, T. (2018). Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language. In Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017)
Davies, Clare ; Tenbrink, Thora. / Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language. Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017). 2018.
@inbook{bb936556fbb14e76ae4182aa8e5f79bb,
title = "Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language",
abstract = "How do people refer to places in their environment, and to what extent do the underlying spatial concepts correspond to officially defined regions? We exemplify some types of evidence that may help to determine local vernacular place concepts. The output of LSA on a web-scraped text corpus was compared with mapping and linguistic data from a pilot experiment, to see how localities within the same geographic area tended to be clustered, how far the spatial geog-raphy is similarly distorted, and how far participants’ verbal protocols revealed a tendency to group places together (and how). Finally, we list some challenges for future triangulation of such data sources, in deriving vernacular place data.",
keywords = "Place, Vernacular geography, Latent semantic analysis (LSA), Spatial cognition, Spatial language, Regions, Categorical reasoning",
author = "Clare Davies and Thora Tenbrink",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319639451",
booktitle = "Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017)",

}

Davies, C & Tenbrink, T 2018, Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language. in Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017).

Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language. / Davies, Clare; Tenbrink, Thora.

Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017). 2018.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language

AU - Davies, Clare

AU - Tenbrink, Thora

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - How do people refer to places in their environment, and to what extent do the underlying spatial concepts correspond to officially defined regions? We exemplify some types of evidence that may help to determine local vernacular place concepts. The output of LSA on a web-scraped text corpus was compared with mapping and linguistic data from a pilot experiment, to see how localities within the same geographic area tended to be clustered, how far the spatial geog-raphy is similarly distorted, and how far participants’ verbal protocols revealed a tendency to group places together (and how). Finally, we list some challenges for future triangulation of such data sources, in deriving vernacular place data.

AB - How do people refer to places in their environment, and to what extent do the underlying spatial concepts correspond to officially defined regions? We exemplify some types of evidence that may help to determine local vernacular place concepts. The output of LSA on a web-scraped text corpus was compared with mapping and linguistic data from a pilot experiment, to see how localities within the same geographic area tended to be clustered, how far the spatial geog-raphy is similarly distorted, and how far participants’ verbal protocols revealed a tendency to group places together (and how). Finally, we list some challenges for future triangulation of such data sources, in deriving vernacular place data.

KW - Place

KW - Vernacular geography

KW - Latent semantic analysis (LSA)

KW - Spatial cognition

KW - Spatial language

KW - Regions

KW - Categorical reasoning

UR - https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319639451

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9783319639451

SN - 9783319876788

BT - Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017)

ER -

Davies C, Tenbrink T. Place as Location Categories: Learning from Language. In Proceedings of Workshops and Posters at the 13th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT 2017). 2018