Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection

Amanda Lees, Jane Payler, Claire Ballinger, Penny Lawrence, Saul Faust, Geoffrey Meads

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Following the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), there has been considerable growth in research with children about health and services that affect them. Creative methods to engage with children have also been developed. One area where progress has been slower is the inclusion of children’s perspectives in qualitative research in the context of clinical trials or feasibility studies. Addressing this gap, this article discusses experiences of, and reflections on, the process of researching children’s views as part of a clinical feasibility study. The article considers what worked well and highlights remaining dilemmas. A new continuum of children’s engagement in research is presented, designed to assist researchers to make explicit the contingent demands on their research, and to suggest a range of techniques from within the broader fields of health, childhood studies and education research that could be used to forward qualitative research in clinical contexts.
Original languageEnglish
JournalQualitative Health Research
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 25 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • children, illness and disease, lived experience, methodology, research design

Cite this

Lees, A., Payler, J., Ballinger, C., Lawrence, P., Faust, S., & Meads, G. (Accepted/In press). Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection. Qualitative Health Research.
Lees, Amanda ; Payler, Jane ; Ballinger, Claire ; Lawrence, Penny ; Faust, Saul ; Meads, Geoffrey. / Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection. In: Qualitative Health Research. 2017.
@article{c47bfea4280d468c8b0b9bb4978655cc,
title = "Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection",
abstract = "Following the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), there has been considerable growth in research with children about health and services that affect them. Creative methods to engage with children have also been developed. One area where progress has been slower is the inclusion of children’s perspectives in qualitative research in the context of clinical trials or feasibility studies. Addressing this gap, this article discusses experiences of, and reflections on, the process of researching children’s views as part of a clinical feasibility study. The article considers what worked well and highlights remaining dilemmas. A new continuum of children’s engagement in research is presented, designed to assist researchers to make explicit the contingent demands on their research, and to suggest a range of techniques from within the broader fields of health, childhood studies and education research that could be used to forward qualitative research in clinical contexts.",
keywords = "children, illness and disease, lived experience, methodology, research design",
author = "Amanda Lees and Jane Payler and Claire Ballinger and Penny Lawrence and Saul Faust and Geoffrey Meads",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "25",
language = "English",

}

Lees, A, Payler, J, Ballinger, C, Lawrence, P, Faust, S & Meads, G 2017, 'Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection', Qualitative Health Research.

Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection. / Lees, Amanda; Payler, Jane; Ballinger, Claire; Lawrence, Penny; Faust, Saul; Meads, Geoffrey.

In: Qualitative Health Research, 25.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection

AU - Lees, Amanda

AU - Payler, Jane

AU - Ballinger, Claire

AU - Lawrence, Penny

AU - Faust, Saul

AU - Meads, Geoffrey

PY - 2017/7/25

Y1 - 2017/7/25

N2 - Following the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), there has been considerable growth in research with children about health and services that affect them. Creative methods to engage with children have also been developed. One area where progress has been slower is the inclusion of children’s perspectives in qualitative research in the context of clinical trials or feasibility studies. Addressing this gap, this article discusses experiences of, and reflections on, the process of researching children’s views as part of a clinical feasibility study. The article considers what worked well and highlights remaining dilemmas. A new continuum of children’s engagement in research is presented, designed to assist researchers to make explicit the contingent demands on their research, and to suggest a range of techniques from within the broader fields of health, childhood studies and education research that could be used to forward qualitative research in clinical contexts.

AB - Following the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), there has been considerable growth in research with children about health and services that affect them. Creative methods to engage with children have also been developed. One area where progress has been slower is the inclusion of children’s perspectives in qualitative research in the context of clinical trials or feasibility studies. Addressing this gap, this article discusses experiences of, and reflections on, the process of researching children’s views as part of a clinical feasibility study. The article considers what worked well and highlights remaining dilemmas. A new continuum of children’s engagement in research is presented, designed to assist researchers to make explicit the contingent demands on their research, and to suggest a range of techniques from within the broader fields of health, childhood studies and education research that could be used to forward qualitative research in clinical contexts.

KW - children, illness and disease, lived experience, methodology, research design

M3 - Article

ER -

Lees A, Payler J, Ballinger C, Lawrence P, Faust S, Meads G. Positioning Children’s Voice in Clinical Trials Research: A new Model for Planning, Collaboration and Reflection. Qualitative Health Research. 2017 Jul 25.