Reappraising David Livingstone's The Geographical Tradition: A Quarter of a Century On

Mark Boyle, Timothy Hall, James Sidaway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The quarter of a century since the publication of David Livingstone’s (1992) The Geographical Tradition provides an apt moment to reflect on the book’s theses, lacunae and legacies, and to take stock of the ways in which its provocations and reception might instruct the wider project of rendering the discipline’s history. In framing this themed intervention, we engage the assertion that contextualisers need contextualising; there exists scope to heighten awareness of the location within time, space and culture from which contextualist historiographies of geography are written. We call attention to the meaning and implications of the particular and situated contextualist methodology mobilised and executed in The Geographical Tradition.
Original languageEnglish
JournalTransactions of the Institute of British Geographers
Volume44
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 28 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Situated messiness
  • Internalism
  • Presentism
  • Historiography
  • Geography
  • David Livingstone

Cite this

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Reappraising David Livingstone's The Geographical Tradition : A Quarter of a Century On. / Boyle, Mark; Hall, Timothy; Sidaway, James.

In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, Vol. 44, No. 2, 28.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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