The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor

Simon Fryer, Keeron Stoner, Tabitha Dickson, Andrew Wilhelmsen, Daniel Cowen, James Faulkner, Danielle Lambrick, Lee Stoner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Intermittent exposure to hypoxia can lead to improved endurance performance. Currently, it is unclear whether peripheral adaptions play a role in improving oxygen delivery and utilization following both training and detraining. This study aimed to characterize skeletal muscle blood flow (mBF), oxygen consumption (mV̇O2), and perfusion adaptations to i) 4-weeks handgrip training in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and ii) following 4-weeks detraining. Using a randomised crossover design, 9 males completed 30-min handgrip training four times a week in hypoxic (14% FiO2 ~ 3250m altitude) and normoxic conditions. mBF, mV̇O2 and perfusion were assessed pre, post 4-weeks training, and following 4-weeks detraining. Hierarchical linear modelling found that mV̇O2 increased at a significantly faster rate (58%) with hypoxic training (0.09 mlO2·min−1 · 100g−1 per week); perfusion increased at a significantly (69%) faster rate with hypoxic training (3.72 μM per week). mBF did not significantly change for the normoxic condition, but there was a significant increase of 0.38 ml· min−1 · 100ml−1 per week (95% CI: 0.35, 0.40) for the hypoxic condition. During 4-weeks detraining, mV̇O2 and perfusion significantly declined at similar rates for both conditions, whereas mBF decreased significantly faster following hypoxic training. Four weeks hypoxic training increases the delivery and utilisation of oxygen in the periphery.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1235-1241
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume37
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Haemodynamic
  • Microvascular adaptation
  • Near infrared spectroscopy
  • Handgrip exercise
  • handgrip exercise
  • microvascular adaptation
  • near infrared spectroscopy

Cite this

Fryer, S., Stoner, K., Dickson, T., Wilhelmsen, A., Cowen, D., Faulkner, J., ... Stoner, L. (2018). The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor. 37(11), 1235-1241. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2018.1554177
Fryer, Simon ; Stoner, Keeron ; Dickson, Tabitha ; Wilhelmsen, Andrew ; Cowen, Daniel ; Faulkner, James ; Lambrick, Danielle ; Stoner, Lee. / The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor. 2018 ; Vol. 37, No. 11. pp. 1235-1241.
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abstract = "Intermittent exposure to hypoxia can lead to improved endurance performance. Currently, it is unclear whether peripheral adaptions play a role in improving oxygen delivery and utilization following both training and detraining. This study aimed to characterize skeletal muscle blood flow (mBF), oxygen consumption (mV̇O2), and perfusion adaptations to i) 4-weeks handgrip training in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and ii) following 4-weeks detraining. Using a randomised crossover design, 9 males completed 30-min handgrip training four times a week in hypoxic (14{\%} FiO2 ~ 3250m altitude) and normoxic conditions. mBF, mV̇O2 and perfusion were assessed pre, post 4-weeks training, and following 4-weeks detraining. Hierarchical linear modelling found that mV̇O2 increased at a significantly faster rate (58{\%}) with hypoxic training (0.09 mlO2·min−1 · 100g−1 per week); perfusion increased at a significantly (69{\%}) faster rate with hypoxic training (3.72 μM per week). mBF did not significantly change for the normoxic condition, but there was a significant increase of 0.38 ml· min−1 · 100ml−1 per week (95{\%} CI: 0.35, 0.40) for the hypoxic condition. During 4-weeks detraining, mV̇O2 and perfusion significantly declined at similar rates for both conditions, whereas mBF decreased significantly faster following hypoxic training. Four weeks hypoxic training increases the delivery and utilisation of oxygen in the periphery.",
keywords = "Haemodynamic, Microvascular adaptation, Near infrared spectroscopy, Handgrip exercise, handgrip exercise, microvascular adaptation, near infrared spectroscopy",
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Fryer, S, Stoner, K, Dickson, T, Wilhelmsen, A, Cowen, D, Faulkner, J, Lambrick, D & Stoner, L 2018, 'The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor' vol. 37, no. 11, pp. 1235-1241. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2018.1554177

The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor. / Fryer, Simon; Stoner, Keeron; Dickson, Tabitha; Wilhelmsen, Andrew; Cowen, Daniel; Faulkner, James; Lambrick, Danielle; Stoner, Lee.

Vol. 37, No. 11, 17.12.2018, p. 1235-1241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - The effects of 4 weeks normobaric hypoxia training on microvascular responses in the forearm flexor

AU - Fryer, Simon

AU - Stoner, Keeron

AU - Dickson, Tabitha

AU - Wilhelmsen, Andrew

AU - Cowen, Daniel

AU - Faulkner, James

AU - Lambrick, Danielle

AU - Stoner, Lee

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N2 - Intermittent exposure to hypoxia can lead to improved endurance performance. Currently, it is unclear whether peripheral adaptions play a role in improving oxygen delivery and utilization following both training and detraining. This study aimed to characterize skeletal muscle blood flow (mBF), oxygen consumption (mV̇O2), and perfusion adaptations to i) 4-weeks handgrip training in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and ii) following 4-weeks detraining. Using a randomised crossover design, 9 males completed 30-min handgrip training four times a week in hypoxic (14% FiO2 ~ 3250m altitude) and normoxic conditions. mBF, mV̇O2 and perfusion were assessed pre, post 4-weeks training, and following 4-weeks detraining. Hierarchical linear modelling found that mV̇O2 increased at a significantly faster rate (58%) with hypoxic training (0.09 mlO2·min−1 · 100g−1 per week); perfusion increased at a significantly (69%) faster rate with hypoxic training (3.72 μM per week). mBF did not significantly change for the normoxic condition, but there was a significant increase of 0.38 ml· min−1 · 100ml−1 per week (95% CI: 0.35, 0.40) for the hypoxic condition. During 4-weeks detraining, mV̇O2 and perfusion significantly declined at similar rates for both conditions, whereas mBF decreased significantly faster following hypoxic training. Four weeks hypoxic training increases the delivery and utilisation of oxygen in the periphery.

AB - Intermittent exposure to hypoxia can lead to improved endurance performance. Currently, it is unclear whether peripheral adaptions play a role in improving oxygen delivery and utilization following both training and detraining. This study aimed to characterize skeletal muscle blood flow (mBF), oxygen consumption (mV̇O2), and perfusion adaptations to i) 4-weeks handgrip training in hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and ii) following 4-weeks detraining. Using a randomised crossover design, 9 males completed 30-min handgrip training four times a week in hypoxic (14% FiO2 ~ 3250m altitude) and normoxic conditions. mBF, mV̇O2 and perfusion were assessed pre, post 4-weeks training, and following 4-weeks detraining. Hierarchical linear modelling found that mV̇O2 increased at a significantly faster rate (58%) with hypoxic training (0.09 mlO2·min−1 · 100g−1 per week); perfusion increased at a significantly (69%) faster rate with hypoxic training (3.72 μM per week). mBF did not significantly change for the normoxic condition, but there was a significant increase of 0.38 ml· min−1 · 100ml−1 per week (95% CI: 0.35, 0.40) for the hypoxic condition. During 4-weeks detraining, mV̇O2 and perfusion significantly declined at similar rates for both conditions, whereas mBF decreased significantly faster following hypoxic training. Four weeks hypoxic training increases the delivery and utilisation of oxygen in the periphery.

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KW - Near infrared spectroscopy

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KW - near infrared spectroscopy

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