The experience and professional development of medical appraisers

Rachel Locke, Jane Bell, Samantha Scallan, Bee Ozguler, Susi Caesar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article explores the experiences of General Practitioner (GP) appraisers working in a unfamiliar setting (Jersey) with appraisees new to the process. Findings were interpreted using the learning theory, ‘situated cognition’, to shed light on the experience of appraisers working with new appraisees more generally and contribute to new understandings of workplace learning. Rich qualitative data derived from transcripts of nine in-depth interviews with GP appraisers were analysed thematically in a rigorous and iterative manner. GP appraisers working in an unfamiliar environment shared a common sense of culture shock and discomfort. Initially, they needed to work much harder than usual to establish rapport and credibility, but by the second round of appraisals, appraisers were reminded of the power of appraisal. The innovative application
of ‘situated cognition’ helps to explain why appraisers felt like ‘novices’ in Jersey and how they were required to reconstruct their professional knowledge. This is the first time appraiser development has been considered in this way and appraisers can be helped to develop professionally if they are offered a mix of appraisal-related activities in new places and with new people. Such implications for educational support apply internationally where doctors are involved in a process of peer review as part of on-going professional development.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-356
Number of pages6
JournalEducation for Primary Care
Volume29
Issue number6
Early online date23 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Professional development
  • Professional education
  • Appraiser practice
  • Practitioner Research
  • General Practitioners

Cite this

Locke, Rachel ; Bell, Jane ; Scallan, Samantha ; Ozguler, Bee ; Caesar, Susi . / The experience and professional development of medical appraisers. In: Education for Primary Care. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 6. pp. 351-356.
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The experience and professional development of medical appraisers. / Locke, Rachel; Bell, Jane; Scallan, Samantha; Ozguler, Bee; Caesar, Susi .

In: Education for Primary Care, Vol. 29, No. 6, 02.11.2018, p. 351-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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