The immortalisation of celebrities.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this chapter I discuss the techniques and technologies that have evolved through history for bestowing immortality on individuals, and examine these in the world of contemporary celebrity. Immortality can be bestowed on an individual the moment part of their person – a recognisable representation of their face, a name on a street or building, or a recording of their voice – is released into material culture through some form of communication medium. Alternatively the person may be housed in another human body, in the form of impersonation. Either way, the experience for the honoured individual is that of replication. There is an important distinction between the practice of bestowing immortality from the posthumous celebration of a life. Death is not by any means a precondition for immortalisation, even if many of its most explicit artefacts (statues, for example) are only brought into existence after death.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPostmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture
Number of pages264
Publication statusPublished - 10 Apr 2017

Keywords

  • celebrity
  • fame
  • media
  • death
  • immortalisation
  • mortality
  • culture

Cite this

Giles, D. (2017). The immortalisation of celebrities. In Postmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture
Giles, David. / The immortalisation of celebrities. Postmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture. 2017.
@inbook{4b6b51a27c9d422e94ae82e4930e9de7,
title = "The immortalisation of celebrities.",
abstract = "In this chapter I discuss the techniques and technologies that have evolved through history for bestowing immortality on individuals, and examine these in the world of contemporary celebrity. Immortality can be bestowed on an individual the moment part of their person – a recognisable representation of their face, a name on a street or building, or a recording of their voice – is released into material culture through some form of communication medium. Alternatively the person may be housed in another human body, in the form of impersonation. Either way, the experience for the honoured individual is that of replication. There is an important distinction between the practice of bestowing immortality from the posthumous celebration of a life. Death is not by any means a precondition for immortalisation, even if many of its most explicit artefacts (statues, for example) are only brought into existence after death.",
keywords = "celebrity, fame, media, death, immortalisation, mortality, culture",
author = "David Giles",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "10",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1-47-248558-8",
booktitle = "Postmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture",

}

Giles, D 2017, The immortalisation of celebrities. in Postmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture.

The immortalisation of celebrities. / Giles, David.

Postmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture. 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - The immortalisation of celebrities.

AU - Giles, David

PY - 2017/4/10

Y1 - 2017/4/10

N2 - In this chapter I discuss the techniques and technologies that have evolved through history for bestowing immortality on individuals, and examine these in the world of contemporary celebrity. Immortality can be bestowed on an individual the moment part of their person – a recognisable representation of their face, a name on a street or building, or a recording of their voice – is released into material culture through some form of communication medium. Alternatively the person may be housed in another human body, in the form of impersonation. Either way, the experience for the honoured individual is that of replication. There is an important distinction between the practice of bestowing immortality from the posthumous celebration of a life. Death is not by any means a precondition for immortalisation, even if many of its most explicit artefacts (statues, for example) are only brought into existence after death.

AB - In this chapter I discuss the techniques and technologies that have evolved through history for bestowing immortality on individuals, and examine these in the world of contemporary celebrity. Immortality can be bestowed on an individual the moment part of their person – a recognisable representation of their face, a name on a street or building, or a recording of their voice – is released into material culture through some form of communication medium. Alternatively the person may be housed in another human body, in the form of impersonation. Either way, the experience for the honoured individual is that of replication. There is an important distinction between the practice of bestowing immortality from the posthumous celebration of a life. Death is not by any means a precondition for immortalisation, even if many of its most explicit artefacts (statues, for example) are only brought into existence after death.

KW - celebrity

KW - fame

KW - media

KW - death

KW - immortalisation

KW - mortality

KW - culture

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-1-47-248558-8

BT - Postmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture

ER -

Giles D. The immortalisation of celebrities. In Postmortal society: Multidisciplinary perspectives on death, survivalism and immortality in contemporary culture. 2017