The influence of reputation information on the assessment of undergraduate student work.

John Batten, Joanne Batey, Laura Shafe, Laura Gubby, Phil Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

The present study employed an experimental design to examine the influence of knowledge of a student’s previous performance and the general quality of their writing style on the assessment of undergraduate student work. Fifteen sport and exercise physiology academics were asked to mark and give feedback on two final year undergraduate student essays. The first student essay that participants marked was a control essay. The second essay was the target essay. Participants read one of three student reputation profiles (positive, negative or neutral) prior to marking this essay. Kruskal–Wallis tests for difference indicated that the marks awarded to each essay did not significantly differ between the three stu- dent reputation conditions. Thematic analysis of the target essay also revealed no apparent differences in the way in which feedback was presented across the three student reputation profiles. It was therefore concluded that non-anonymous marking did not induce marker bias in this instance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-435
JournalAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Dec 2011

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Anonymity
  • Bias
  • Pedagogy

Cite this

Batten, John ; Batey, Joanne ; Shafe, Laura ; Gubby, Laura ; Birch, Phil. / The influence of reputation information on the assessment of undergraduate student work. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 417-435.
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Batten, J, Batey, J, Shafe, L, Gubby, L & Birch, P 2011, 'The influence of reputation information on the assessment of undergraduate student work.' vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 417-435. https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2011.640928

The influence of reputation information on the assessment of undergraduate student work. / Batten, John; Batey, Joanne; Shafe, Laura; Gubby, Laura; Birch, Phil.

Vol. 38, No. 4, 09.12.2011, p. 417-435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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