Thinking like an engineer: using engineering habits of mind to redesign engineering education for global competitiveness.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearch

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Abstract

If we want to ensure that young engineers are ready to meet the challenges of the future and can operate in a global environment, we need to know how successful engineers think and act when faced with challenging problems. Once we have identified these distinctive engineering ‘habits of mind’ (EHoM) we can then suggest how the education and training system might be re-designed to ensure the cultivation of these EHoM in school, college and university. Funded by the Royal Academy of Engineering, our research found that there was considerable agreement about the six habits of mind that engineers use most frequently when engaged in the core activity of ‘making’ things or ‘making things work better’. As a result of these findings, we suggest that active teaching approaches, such as PBL or CDIO, although helpful, can in themselves only take the learner so far. However, if the curriculum overtly articulates EHoM as an outcome of learning and if teachers provide students with opportunities to develop and practice them at all levels of the education system, more successful engineering learning will occur.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSEFI 2014 Annual Conference
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • engineering education
  • Curriculum development
  • Active learning

Cite this

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title = "Thinking like an engineer: using engineering habits of mind to redesign engineering education for global competitiveness.",
abstract = "If we want to ensure that young engineers are ready to meet the challenges of the future and can operate in a global environment, we need to know how successful engineers think and act when faced with challenging problems. Once we have identified these distinctive engineering ‘habits of mind’ (EHoM) we can then suggest how the education and training system might be re-designed to ensure the cultivation of these EHoM in school, college and university. Funded by the Royal Academy of Engineering, our research found that there was considerable agreement about the six habits of mind that engineers use most frequently when engaged in the core activity of ‘making’ things or ‘making things work better’. As a result of these findings, we suggest that active teaching approaches, such as PBL or CDIO, although helpful, can in themselves only take the learner so far. However, if the curriculum overtly articulates EHoM as an outcome of learning and if teachers provide students with opportunities to develop and practice them at all levels of the education system, more successful engineering learning will occur.",
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Thinking like an engineer: using engineering habits of mind to redesign engineering education for global competitiveness. / Lucas, Bill; Hanson, Janet.

SEFI 2014 Annual Conference. 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearch

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T1 - Thinking like an engineer: using engineering habits of mind to redesign engineering education for global competitiveness.

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AU - Hanson, Janet

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AB - If we want to ensure that young engineers are ready to meet the challenges of the future and can operate in a global environment, we need to know how successful engineers think and act when faced with challenging problems. Once we have identified these distinctive engineering ‘habits of mind’ (EHoM) we can then suggest how the education and training system might be re-designed to ensure the cultivation of these EHoM in school, college and university. Funded by the Royal Academy of Engineering, our research found that there was considerable agreement about the six habits of mind that engineers use most frequently when engaged in the core activity of ‘making’ things or ‘making things work better’. As a result of these findings, we suggest that active teaching approaches, such as PBL or CDIO, although helpful, can in themselves only take the learner so far. However, if the curriculum overtly articulates EHoM as an outcome of learning and if teachers provide students with opportunities to develop and practice them at all levels of the education system, more successful engineering learning will occur.

KW - engineering education

KW - Curriculum development

KW - Active learning

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-2-87352-004-5

BT - SEFI 2014 Annual Conference

ER -