Twelve Not So Angry Men

Inclusive Masculinities in Australian Contact Sports

Ashnil Murray, Adam White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Sport’s utility in the development of a conservative orthodox ideal of masculinity based upon homophobia, aggression and emotional restrictiveness, is well evidenced in critical masculinities scholarship. However, contemporary research is reflecting a more nuanced understanding of male behaviour in many Western contexts, with men performing softer and more inclusive versions of masculinities. Through exploring the experiences of twelve Australian contact sport athletes, this research establishes findings to support the growing body of inclusive masculinities research. Results show that these men value a softer representation of masculinity based upon pro-gay sentiments and being emotionally open; while often being critical of aspects of orthodox masculinities which male team sport previously promoted.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Review for the Sociology of Sport
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2015

Keywords

  • Homophobia
  • Inclusive masculinity
  • Masculinity
  • Sport

Cite this

Murray, Ashnil ; White, Adam. / Twelve Not So Angry Men : Inclusive Masculinities in Australian Contact Sports. In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport. 2015.
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Twelve Not So Angry Men : Inclusive Masculinities in Australian Contact Sports. / Murray, Ashnil; White, Adam.

In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 15.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Sport’s utility in the development of a conservative orthodox ideal of masculinity based upon homophobia, aggression and emotional restrictiveness, is well evidenced in critical masculinities scholarship. However, contemporary research is reflecting a more nuanced understanding of male behaviour in many Western contexts, with men performing softer and more inclusive versions of masculinities. Through exploring the experiences of twelve Australian contact sport athletes, this research establishes findings to support the growing body of inclusive masculinities research. Results show that these men value a softer representation of masculinity based upon pro-gay sentiments and being emotionally open; while often being critical of aspects of orthodox masculinities which male team sport previously promoted.

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