‘We do not wish to be sofa cushions, or even props to men, but we wish to work by their side’: celebrating women as popular educators at the Anglican Church congresses 1881–1913

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The Anglican Church congresses sought to foster relations between clergy and lay people. They promoted the Church as part of the social fabric of the nation with parades, civic receptions, services and public talks. Women were a presence at the congresses as platform speakers, organisers, hostesses and members of the audience. Congresses provided opportunities for informal collaborations and networking between organisations including the National Union of Women Workers, Mothers’ Union and Girls’ Friendly Society. Dedicated women’s sections from 1881 provided a space that was exploited by women activists seeking a voice in the public sphere. The congresses reflected a context of increasing professionalisation amongst women. This article celebrates the contribution made by women in the role of popular educators via congress platforms between 1882 and 1913. In addition, the article seeks to commemorate the unvoiced presence of working class women who engaged with the congresses as members of the audience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)180-196
Number of pages17
JournalHistory of Education
Volume48
Issue number2
Early online date6 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Feb 2019

Keywords

  • Women: popular education; church congresss; Anglican
  • Women
  • Popular education
  • Anglican
  • Church congresses

Cite this

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title = "‘We do not wish to be sofa cushions, or even props to men, but we wish to work by their side’: celebrating women as popular educators at the Anglican Church congresses 1881–1913",
abstract = "The Anglican Church congresses sought to foster relations between clergy and lay people. They promoted the Church as part of the social fabric of the nation with parades, civic receptions, services and public talks. Women were a presence at the congresses as platform speakers, organisers, hostesses and members of the audience. Congresses provided opportunities for informal collaborations and networking between organisations including the National Union of Women Workers, Mothers’ Union and Girls’ Friendly Society. Dedicated women’s sections from 1881 provided a space that was exploited by women activists seeking a voice in the public sphere. The congresses reflected a context of increasing professionalisation amongst women. This article celebrates the contribution made by women in the role of popular educators via congress platforms between 1882 and 1913. In addition, the article seeks to commemorate the unvoiced presence of working class women who engaged with the congresses as members of the audience.",
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‘We do not wish to be sofa cushions, or even props to men, but we wish to work by their side’: celebrating women as popular educators at the Anglican Church congresses 1881–1913. / Anderson-Faithful, Sue.

In: History of Education, Vol. 48, No. 2, 06.02.2019, p. 180-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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