An Examination of Sport Fandom in the United Kingdom: A Comparative Analysis of Fan Behaviors, Socialization Processes, and Team Identification

Keith D. Parry, Ian Jones, Daniel L. Wann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Despite recent cross-cultural analyses of sport fandom, work in the field is still limited. To partially fill this research void, the current investigation investigated sport fandom in the United Kingdom, and included cross-cultural comparison with existing data. Four research areas were reviewed: a) sport fan behaviors, b) socialization into the sport fan role, c) identification with the social role of sport fan, and d) team identification. A sample of 252 students at a university in the United Kingdom completed a questionnaire packet assessing demographics, fandom, fan behaviors, team identification, and the impact of various socialization agents. Results revealed gender differences in behavior (e.g., males reported greater levels of participation than females) and both team identification and fandom were significant predictors of fan behavior. The importance of the father as a socialization agent was highlighted throughout the sample, and levels of identification were generally high. Cross-cultural analysis indicated that socialization agents for the UK were more varied than other countries, UK fans were more likely to watch sport live, and UK males were more likely to watch and discuss sport daily. In general, it was demonstrated that UK fan behavior was closer to that of Americans and, in particular, Australian fans, rather than fans in European (Greek and Norwegian) samples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationJournal of Sport Behavior
Pages251-267
Number of pages17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Publication series

NameJournal of Sport Behavior
Volume37

Keywords

  • Australian sport fans
  • sport fan socialization
  • sport fandom
  • sport spectating

Cite this

Parry, Keith D. ; Jones, Ian ; Wann, Daniel L. / An Examination of Sport Fandom in the United Kingdom: A Comparative Analysis of Fan Behaviors, Socialization Processes, and Team Identification. Journal of Sport Behavior. 2014. pp. 251-267 (Journal of Sport Behavior).
@inbook{35ac380e818a4c3faf5010a0c749812c,
title = "An Examination of Sport Fandom in the United Kingdom: A Comparative Analysis of Fan Behaviors, Socialization Processes, and Team Identification",
abstract = "Despite recent cross-cultural analyses of sport fandom, work in the field is still limited. To partially fill this research void, the current investigation investigated sport fandom in the United Kingdom, and included cross-cultural comparison with existing data. Four research areas were reviewed: a) sport fan behaviors, b) socialization into the sport fan role, c) identification with the social role of sport fan, and d) team identification. A sample of 252 students at a university in the United Kingdom completed a questionnaire packet assessing demographics, fandom, fan behaviors, team identification, and the impact of various socialization agents. Results revealed gender differences in behavior (e.g., males reported greater levels of participation than females) and both team identification and fandom were significant predictors of fan behavior. The importance of the father as a socialization agent was highlighted throughout the sample, and levels of identification were generally high. Cross-cultural analysis indicated that socialization agents for the UK were more varied than other countries, UK fans were more likely to watch sport live, and UK males were more likely to watch and discuss sport daily. In general, it was demonstrated that UK fan behavior was closer to that of Americans and, in particular, Australian fans, rather than fans in European (Greek and Norwegian) samples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)",
keywords = "Australian sport fans, sport fan socialization, sport fandom, sport spectating",
author = "Parry, {Keith D.} and Ian Jones and Wann, {Daniel L.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1177/1012690210380582",
language = "English",
isbn = "1012690210",
series = "Journal of Sport Behavior",
pages = "251--267",
booktitle = "Journal of Sport Behavior",

}

An Examination of Sport Fandom in the United Kingdom: A Comparative Analysis of Fan Behaviors, Socialization Processes, and Team Identification. / Parry, Keith D.; Jones, Ian; Wann, Daniel L.

Journal of Sport Behavior. 2014. p. 251-267 (Journal of Sport Behavior; Vol. 37).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - An Examination of Sport Fandom in the United Kingdom: A Comparative Analysis of Fan Behaviors, Socialization Processes, and Team Identification

AU - Parry, Keith D.

AU - Jones, Ian

AU - Wann, Daniel L.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Despite recent cross-cultural analyses of sport fandom, work in the field is still limited. To partially fill this research void, the current investigation investigated sport fandom in the United Kingdom, and included cross-cultural comparison with existing data. Four research areas were reviewed: a) sport fan behaviors, b) socialization into the sport fan role, c) identification with the social role of sport fan, and d) team identification. A sample of 252 students at a university in the United Kingdom completed a questionnaire packet assessing demographics, fandom, fan behaviors, team identification, and the impact of various socialization agents. Results revealed gender differences in behavior (e.g., males reported greater levels of participation than females) and both team identification and fandom were significant predictors of fan behavior. The importance of the father as a socialization agent was highlighted throughout the sample, and levels of identification were generally high. Cross-cultural analysis indicated that socialization agents for the UK were more varied than other countries, UK fans were more likely to watch sport live, and UK males were more likely to watch and discuss sport daily. In general, it was demonstrated that UK fan behavior was closer to that of Americans and, in particular, Australian fans, rather than fans in European (Greek and Norwegian) samples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

AB - Despite recent cross-cultural analyses of sport fandom, work in the field is still limited. To partially fill this research void, the current investigation investigated sport fandom in the United Kingdom, and included cross-cultural comparison with existing data. Four research areas were reviewed: a) sport fan behaviors, b) socialization into the sport fan role, c) identification with the social role of sport fan, and d) team identification. A sample of 252 students at a university in the United Kingdom completed a questionnaire packet assessing demographics, fandom, fan behaviors, team identification, and the impact of various socialization agents. Results revealed gender differences in behavior (e.g., males reported greater levels of participation than females) and both team identification and fandom were significant predictors of fan behavior. The importance of the father as a socialization agent was highlighted throughout the sample, and levels of identification were generally high. Cross-cultural analysis indicated that socialization agents for the UK were more varied than other countries, UK fans were more likely to watch sport live, and UK males were more likely to watch and discuss sport daily. In general, it was demonstrated that UK fan behavior was closer to that of Americans and, in particular, Australian fans, rather than fans in European (Greek and Norwegian) samples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

KW - Australian sport fans

KW - sport fan socialization

KW - sport fandom

KW - sport spectating

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/examination-sport-fandom-united-kingdom-comparative-analysis-fan-behaviors-socialization-processes-t

U2 - 10.1177/1012690210380582

DO - 10.1177/1012690210380582

M3 - Chapter

SN - 1012690210

T3 - Journal of Sport Behavior

SP - 251

EP - 267

BT - Journal of Sport Behavior

ER -