Christianity: Queer Pasts, Queer Futures

Lisa Isherwood

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Abstract

This paper asks whether Christianity has always been queer, is the very nature of it beyond what one might expect from reality? Does the core of Christianity destabilise the categories by which subsequent Christian leaders have created doctrine, developed ethics and controlled the faithful? Is this queer core located in the very notion of incarnation itself, an event that truly changes all we thought we knew about the nature of materiality? The paper is not attempting to find a queer past in order to justify a queer present and solidify a queer future but rather to suggest that fluidity, rupture and unexpected outcomes should be at the heart of the Christian enterprise. It also follows that if the categories which have been used to exclude are themselves queered then Christianity becomes a far more inclusive way of living. The paper also asks whether the very notion of monotheism itself is a barrier to what may be understood as the fluid volatile core of incarnational religion. What does the queer theologian do with the ONE?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1345-1374
JournalHorizonte
Volume13
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

Keywords

  • Queer theology
  • incarnation
  • monotheism
  • Thecla
  • cross dressing
  • Bi-Christ

Cite this

Isherwood, L. (2015). Christianity: Queer Pasts, Queer Futures. Horizonte, 13, 1345-1374.
Isherwood, Lisa. / Christianity: Queer Pasts, Queer Futures. In: Horizonte. 2015 ; Vol. 13. pp. 1345-1374.
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Isherwood, L 2015, 'Christianity: Queer Pasts, Queer Futures', Horizonte, vol. 13, pp. 1345-1374.

Christianity: Queer Pasts, Queer Futures. / Isherwood, Lisa.

In: Horizonte, Vol. 13, 01.09.2015, p. 1345-1374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Isherwood L. Christianity: Queer Pasts, Queer Futures. Horizonte. 2015 Sep 1;13:1345-1374.