Constructing Contradiction: The Power and Powerlessness of Women in the Giving and Taking of Evidence in the Bryce Commission, 1895.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The underlying theoretical framework for this paper owes its genesis to three sources; first a late night street conversation after a WEA class several years ago with an unidentified woman who had won a scholarship from an elementary school to a girls' high school. She commented to my surprise at the time, 'Of course, Miss X never wanted us scholarship girls at the school'. Her words returned to me when reading the Bryce Commission. Second, it owes something to a loose appropriation of Foucault's notions of power/knowledge and 'power producing'. Within this framework, the state is viewed as 'a complex network of discursive practice . . . which achieves its regulatory effects . . . through dispersed, multiple and often contradictory and competing discourses'. J. Kenway (1992) Identity and Diversity, Gender and the Experience of Education, ed. M. Blair et al. (Multilingual Matters, 1995), 137, 134. See also B. Smart, Foucault, Marxism and Critique (Routledge G. Rose, Dialectic of Nihilism: Post-structuralism and the Law (Blackwell, 1984)
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-306
JournalHistory of Education
Volume26
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jul 2006

Keywords

  • Foucault
  • power/knowledge
  • power producing
  • Bryce Commission
  • education
  • girls
  • women

Cite this

@article{2f188d7ad68347829a790cea593f4c7a,
title = "Constructing Contradiction: The Power and Powerlessness of Women in the Giving and Taking of Evidence in the Bryce Commission, 1895.",
abstract = "The underlying theoretical framework for this paper owes its genesis to three sources; first a late night street conversation after a WEA class several years ago with an unidentified woman who had won a scholarship from an elementary school to a girls' high school. She commented to my surprise at the time, 'Of course, Miss X never wanted us scholarship girls at the school'. Her words returned to me when reading the Bryce Commission. Second, it owes something to a loose appropriation of Foucault's notions of power/knowledge and 'power producing'. Within this framework, the state is viewed as 'a complex network of discursive practice . . . which achieves its regulatory effects . . . through dispersed, multiple and often contradictory and competing discourses'. J. Kenway (1992) Identity and Diversity, Gender and the Experience of Education, ed. M. Blair et al. (Multilingual Matters, 1995), 137, 134. See also B. Smart, Foucault, Marxism and Critique (Routledge G. Rose, Dialectic of Nihilism: Post-structuralism and the Law (Blackwell, 1984)",
keywords = "Foucault, power/knowledge, power producing, Bryce Commission, education, girls, women",
author = "Joyce Goodman",
year = "2006",
month = "7",
day = "28",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "287--306",
number = "3",

}

Constructing Contradiction: The Power and Powerlessness of Women in the Giving and Taking of Evidence in the Bryce Commission, 1895. / Goodman, Joyce.

In: History of Education, Vol. 26, No. 3, 28.07.2006, p. 287-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Constructing Contradiction: The Power and Powerlessness of Women in the Giving and Taking of Evidence in the Bryce Commission, 1895.

AU - Goodman, Joyce

PY - 2006/7/28

Y1 - 2006/7/28

N2 - The underlying theoretical framework for this paper owes its genesis to three sources; first a late night street conversation after a WEA class several years ago with an unidentified woman who had won a scholarship from an elementary school to a girls' high school. She commented to my surprise at the time, 'Of course, Miss X never wanted us scholarship girls at the school'. Her words returned to me when reading the Bryce Commission. Second, it owes something to a loose appropriation of Foucault's notions of power/knowledge and 'power producing'. Within this framework, the state is viewed as 'a complex network of discursive practice . . . which achieves its regulatory effects . . . through dispersed, multiple and often contradictory and competing discourses'. J. Kenway (1992) Identity and Diversity, Gender and the Experience of Education, ed. M. Blair et al. (Multilingual Matters, 1995), 137, 134. See also B. Smart, Foucault, Marxism and Critique (Routledge G. Rose, Dialectic of Nihilism: Post-structuralism and the Law (Blackwell, 1984)

AB - The underlying theoretical framework for this paper owes its genesis to three sources; first a late night street conversation after a WEA class several years ago with an unidentified woman who had won a scholarship from an elementary school to a girls' high school. She commented to my surprise at the time, 'Of course, Miss X never wanted us scholarship girls at the school'. Her words returned to me when reading the Bryce Commission. Second, it owes something to a loose appropriation of Foucault's notions of power/knowledge and 'power producing'. Within this framework, the state is viewed as 'a complex network of discursive practice . . . which achieves its regulatory effects . . . through dispersed, multiple and often contradictory and competing discourses'. J. Kenway (1992) Identity and Diversity, Gender and the Experience of Education, ed. M. Blair et al. (Multilingual Matters, 1995), 137, 134. See also B. Smart, Foucault, Marxism and Critique (Routledge G. Rose, Dialectic of Nihilism: Post-structuralism and the Law (Blackwell, 1984)

KW - Foucault

KW - power/knowledge

KW - power producing

KW - Bryce Commission

KW - education

KW - girls

KW - women

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 287

EP - 306

IS - 3

ER -