Friends Reconsidered: Cultural Politics, Intergenerationality, and Afterlives

Neil Ewen, Shelley Cobb, Hannah Hamad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

With the passing in 2014 of the twentieth anniversary of its debut episode, the iconic millennial sitcom Friends retains a rare cultural currency and remains a crucial reference point for understanding the concerns of Generation X. This special issue, therefore, interrogates the contemporary and historical significance of Friends as a popular sitcom that reflected and obfuscated American fin de siècle anxieties at the time, and considers the lasting resonance of its cultural afterlife. Its abiding impact as millennial cultural touchstone can be seen in its persistent ability to find new generations of viewers and its manifest influence on myriad extratextual phenomena.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)683-691
Number of pages9
JournalTelevision and New Media
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Friends
  • television
  • Generation X
  • Millennials
  • generational identity
  • 1990s

Cite this

Ewen, Neil ; Cobb, Shelley ; Hamad, Hannah. / Friends Reconsidered: Cultural Politics, Intergenerationality, and Afterlives. In: Television and New Media. 2018 ; Vol. 19, No. 8. pp. 683-691.
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Ewen, N, Cobb, S & Hamad, H 2018, 'Friends Reconsidered: Cultural Politics, Intergenerationality, and Afterlives', Television and New Media, vol. 19, no. 8, pp. 683-691. https://doi.org/10.1177/1527476418778426

Friends Reconsidered: Cultural Politics, Intergenerationality, and Afterlives. / Ewen, Neil; Cobb, Shelley; Hamad, Hannah.

In: Television and New Media, Vol. 19, No. 8, 01.12.2018, p. 683-691.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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