Holy Mothers of God: Sex work, inheritance, and the women of Jesus' genealogy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this article I consider the stories of Jesus’ women ancestors in the genealogy which opens the Gospel of Matthew. Reading these stories in light of Marxist-feminist analyses of marriage, sex work and reproductive labour; alongside contemporary sex workers’ rights discourse, and through Marcella Althaus-Reid’s claim that all theology is “a sexual act”, I explore their implications for contemporary debates about property and propriety in both Christian systematic theology and contemporary Christian sexual ethics – which cannot, of course, be disentangled from one another. To conclude, I return to the twinned questions of righteousness and purity which centrally define both theological accounts of Christian identity and Christian sexual ethics, suggesting that righteousness relies for its coherence not only on the abjection of those who fall short of its standards, but also on their labour.
Original languageEnglish
JournalTheology and Sexuality
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Aug 2019

Keywords

  • Sex work
  • Theology
  • Marriage
  • Christian identity
  • Matthew's gospel
  • Jesus' genealogy

Cite this

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Holy Mothers of God : Sex work, inheritance, and the women of Jesus' genealogy. / Rose, Marika.

14.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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