Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory.

Deborah Crossland, Wendy Kneller, Rachel Wilcock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In an assessment of the Alcohol Myopia Theory, the effects of alcohol on an eyewitness’s recall of high and low salience details were investigated. In laboratory study 1, participants watched a staged videoed theft whilst either sober (control or placebo), above (MBAC=0.09%) or below (MBAC=0.06%) the UK drink-drive limit. A week later a free-recall and recognition test were completed. Intoxication was not found to reduce recall accuracy using either recall task. In Study 2, while on a night out participants watched the videoed theft with high (MBAC=0.14%) or low (MBAC=0.05%) BAC’s. A week later the free-recall and recognition test were attempted. High BAC’s were seen to impair recall when memory was assessed through free-recall but not with the recognition test. Neither study found the attention narrowing predicted by AMT using either recall technique, although poor recall for low salience details in all groups may have contributed to this result.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-281
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume30
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016

Keywords

  • Alcohol Myopia Theory
  • eyewitness
  • recall

Cite this

Crossland, D., Kneller, W., & Wilcock, R. (2016). Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 30(2), 270-281.
Crossland, Deborah ; Kneller, Wendy ; Wilcock, Rachel. / Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory. In: Applied Cognitive Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 270-281.
@article{c1686ddcbe3343a68424d3344e4f4c7b,
title = "Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory.",
abstract = "In an assessment of the Alcohol Myopia Theory, the effects of alcohol on an eyewitness’s recall of high and low salience details were investigated. In laboratory study 1, participants watched a staged videoed theft whilst either sober (control or placebo), above (MBAC=0.09{\%}) or below (MBAC=0.06{\%}) the UK drink-drive limit. A week later a free-recall and recognition test were completed. Intoxication was not found to reduce recall accuracy using either recall task. In Study 2, while on a night out participants watched the videoed theft with high (MBAC=0.14{\%}) or low (MBAC=0.05{\%}) BAC’s. A week later the free-recall and recognition test were attempted. High BAC’s were seen to impair recall when memory was assessed through free-recall but not with the recognition test. Neither study found the attention narrowing predicted by AMT using either recall technique, although poor recall for low salience details in all groups may have contributed to this result.",
keywords = "Alcohol Myopia Theory, eyewitness, recall",
author = "Deborah Crossland and Wendy Kneller and Rachel Wilcock",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "270--281",
number = "2",

}

Crossland, D, Kneller, W & Wilcock, R 2016, 'Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory.', Applied Cognitive Psychology, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 270-281.

Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory. / Crossland, Deborah; Kneller, Wendy; Wilcock, Rachel.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.03.2016, p. 270-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory.

AU - Crossland, Deborah

AU - Kneller, Wendy

AU - Wilcock, Rachel

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - In an assessment of the Alcohol Myopia Theory, the effects of alcohol on an eyewitness’s recall of high and low salience details were investigated. In laboratory study 1, participants watched a staged videoed theft whilst either sober (control or placebo), above (MBAC=0.09%) or below (MBAC=0.06%) the UK drink-drive limit. A week later a free-recall and recognition test were completed. Intoxication was not found to reduce recall accuracy using either recall task. In Study 2, while on a night out participants watched the videoed theft with high (MBAC=0.14%) or low (MBAC=0.05%) BAC’s. A week later the free-recall and recognition test were attempted. High BAC’s were seen to impair recall when memory was assessed through free-recall but not with the recognition test. Neither study found the attention narrowing predicted by AMT using either recall technique, although poor recall for low salience details in all groups may have contributed to this result.

AB - In an assessment of the Alcohol Myopia Theory, the effects of alcohol on an eyewitness’s recall of high and low salience details were investigated. In laboratory study 1, participants watched a staged videoed theft whilst either sober (control or placebo), above (MBAC=0.09%) or below (MBAC=0.06%) the UK drink-drive limit. A week later a free-recall and recognition test were completed. Intoxication was not found to reduce recall accuracy using either recall task. In Study 2, while on a night out participants watched the videoed theft with high (MBAC=0.14%) or low (MBAC=0.05%) BAC’s. A week later the free-recall and recognition test were attempted. High BAC’s were seen to impair recall when memory was assessed through free-recall but not with the recognition test. Neither study found the attention narrowing predicted by AMT using either recall technique, although poor recall for low salience details in all groups may have contributed to this result.

KW - Alcohol Myopia Theory

KW - eyewitness

KW - recall

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 270

EP - 281

IS - 2

ER -

Crossland D, Kneller W, Wilcock R. Intoxicated witnesses: Testing the validity of the Alcohol Myopia Theory. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 2016 Mar 1;30(2):270-281.