Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressures responses to lower limb resistance exercise

Simon Fryer, Keeron Stone, Tabitha Dickson, James Faulkner, Danielle Lambrick, Pablo Corres, Lauren Jerred, Lee Stoner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Background and aims: Although it is well known that resistance training (RT) is beneficial for patients suffering a variety of cardiovascular diseases, it remains underutilized as a rehabilitation tool as there is no reliable way to monitor the additional stress placed on the central organs. The current study aimed to determine between-day reliability of central haemodynamic indices determined using oscillometric pulse wave analysis (PWA) during progressive sub-maximal RT. Methods: Nineteen healthy young males were tested on 3 different mornings in a fasted state. Central hemodynamic variables including augmentation index (AIx), AIx normalized to a heart rate of 75 beats per minute (AIx@75), central systolic blood pressure (cSBP), forwards (Pf) and backwards (Pb) wave reflection, were determined at rest, as well as during leg extension RT at 10, 15 and 20% of maximal volitional contraction (MVC), and following 1 min and 5 min passive recovery. Results: During RT at 10, 15 and 20% MVC, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values for AIx@75 (0.76-0.9), cSBP (0.74-0.78), Pf (0.75-0.82) and Pb (0.75-0.83) exceeded the criteria (0.75) for excellent reliability. During 5 min recovery the ICC values for AIx@75 (0.87-0.87), cSBP (0.69-0.7), Pf (0.63-0.67) and Pb (0.63-0.66) indicated good to excellent reliability. Conclusions: Clinically meaningful changes in central hemodynamic indices can be obtained during resistance training using oscillometric PWA devices. This technology holds potential for advancing resistance training prescription guidelines for patients with overt cardiovascular diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume00
Issue number000
Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Resistance training
  • Pulse wave analysis
  • Augmentation index

Cite this

Fryer, S., Stone, K., Dickson, T., Faulkner, J., Lambrick, D., Corres, P., ... Stoner, L. (2017). Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressures responses to lower limb resistance exercise. 00(000), 1-16.
Fryer, Simon ; Stone, Keeron ; Dickson, Tabitha ; Faulkner, James ; Lambrick, Danielle ; Corres, Pablo ; Jerred, Lauren ; Stoner, Lee. / Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressures responses to lower limb resistance exercise. 2017 ; Vol. 00, No. 000. pp. 1-16.
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abstract = "Background and aims: Although it is well known that resistance training (RT) is beneficial for patients suffering a variety of cardiovascular diseases, it remains underutilized as a rehabilitation tool as there is no reliable way to monitor the additional stress placed on the central organs. The current study aimed to determine between-day reliability of central haemodynamic indices determined using oscillometric pulse wave analysis (PWA) during progressive sub-maximal RT. Methods: Nineteen healthy young males were tested on 3 different mornings in a fasted state. Central hemodynamic variables including augmentation index (AIx), AIx normalized to a heart rate of 75 beats per minute (AIx@75), central systolic blood pressure (cSBP), forwards (Pf) and backwards (Pb) wave reflection, were determined at rest, as well as during leg extension RT at 10, 15 and 20{\%} of maximal volitional contraction (MVC), and following 1 min and 5 min passive recovery. Results: During RT at 10, 15 and 20{\%} MVC, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values for AIx@75 (0.76-0.9), cSBP (0.74-0.78), Pf (0.75-0.82) and Pb (0.75-0.83) exceeded the criteria (0.75) for excellent reliability. During 5 min recovery the ICC values for AIx@75 (0.87-0.87), cSBP (0.69-0.7), Pf (0.63-0.67) and Pb (0.63-0.66) indicated good to excellent reliability. Conclusions: Clinically meaningful changes in central hemodynamic indices can be obtained during resistance training using oscillometric PWA devices. This technology holds potential for advancing resistance training prescription guidelines for patients with overt cardiovascular diseases.",
keywords = "Resistance training, Pulse wave analysis, Augmentation index",
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Fryer, S, Stone, K, Dickson, T, Faulkner, J, Lambrick, D, Corres, P, Jerred, L & Stoner, L 2017, 'Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressures responses to lower limb resistance exercise' vol. 00, no. 000, pp. 1-16.

Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressures responses to lower limb resistance exercise. / Fryer, Simon; Stone, Keeron; Dickson, Tabitha; Faulkner, James; Lambrick, Danielle; Corres, Pablo; Jerred, Lauren; Stoner, Lee.

Vol. 00, No. 000, 05.12.2017, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressures responses to lower limb resistance exercise

AU - Fryer, Simon

AU - Stone, Keeron

AU - Dickson, Tabitha

AU - Faulkner, James

AU - Lambrick, Danielle

AU - Corres, Pablo

AU - Jerred, Lauren

AU - Stoner, Lee

PY - 2017/12/5

Y1 - 2017/12/5

N2 - Background and aims: Although it is well known that resistance training (RT) is beneficial for patients suffering a variety of cardiovascular diseases, it remains underutilized as a rehabilitation tool as there is no reliable way to monitor the additional stress placed on the central organs. The current study aimed to determine between-day reliability of central haemodynamic indices determined using oscillometric pulse wave analysis (PWA) during progressive sub-maximal RT. Methods: Nineteen healthy young males were tested on 3 different mornings in a fasted state. Central hemodynamic variables including augmentation index (AIx), AIx normalized to a heart rate of 75 beats per minute (AIx@75), central systolic blood pressure (cSBP), forwards (Pf) and backwards (Pb) wave reflection, were determined at rest, as well as during leg extension RT at 10, 15 and 20% of maximal volitional contraction (MVC), and following 1 min and 5 min passive recovery. Results: During RT at 10, 15 and 20% MVC, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values for AIx@75 (0.76-0.9), cSBP (0.74-0.78), Pf (0.75-0.82) and Pb (0.75-0.83) exceeded the criteria (0.75) for excellent reliability. During 5 min recovery the ICC values for AIx@75 (0.87-0.87), cSBP (0.69-0.7), Pf (0.63-0.67) and Pb (0.63-0.66) indicated good to excellent reliability. Conclusions: Clinically meaningful changes in central hemodynamic indices can be obtained during resistance training using oscillometric PWA devices. This technology holds potential for advancing resistance training prescription guidelines for patients with overt cardiovascular diseases.

AB - Background and aims: Although it is well known that resistance training (RT) is beneficial for patients suffering a variety of cardiovascular diseases, it remains underutilized as a rehabilitation tool as there is no reliable way to monitor the additional stress placed on the central organs. The current study aimed to determine between-day reliability of central haemodynamic indices determined using oscillometric pulse wave analysis (PWA) during progressive sub-maximal RT. Methods: Nineteen healthy young males were tested on 3 different mornings in a fasted state. Central hemodynamic variables including augmentation index (AIx), AIx normalized to a heart rate of 75 beats per minute (AIx@75), central systolic blood pressure (cSBP), forwards (Pf) and backwards (Pb) wave reflection, were determined at rest, as well as during leg extension RT at 10, 15 and 20% of maximal volitional contraction (MVC), and following 1 min and 5 min passive recovery. Results: During RT at 10, 15 and 20% MVC, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values for AIx@75 (0.76-0.9), cSBP (0.74-0.78), Pf (0.75-0.82) and Pb (0.75-0.83) exceeded the criteria (0.75) for excellent reliability. During 5 min recovery the ICC values for AIx@75 (0.87-0.87), cSBP (0.69-0.7), Pf (0.63-0.67) and Pb (0.63-0.66) indicated good to excellent reliability. Conclusions: Clinically meaningful changes in central hemodynamic indices can be obtained during resistance training using oscillometric PWA devices. This technology holds potential for advancing resistance training prescription guidelines for patients with overt cardiovascular diseases.

KW - Resistance training

KW - Pulse wave analysis

KW - Augmentation index

M3 - Article

VL - 00

SP - 1

EP - 16

IS - 000

ER -

Fryer S, Stone K, Dickson T, Faulkner J, Lambrick D, Corres P et al. Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressures responses to lower limb resistance exercise. 2017 Dec 5;00(000):1-16.