The pressure-dependency of local measures of arterial stiffness

Gabriel Zieff, Kevin Heffernan, Keeron Stoner, Simon Fryer, Daniel Creduer, Erik Hanson, James Faulkner, Lee Stoner

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine which ultrasound-based, single-point arterial stiffness estimate is least dependent on blood pressure (BP) to improve assessment of local vascular function. METHODS: Ultrasound was used to assess blood flow and diameters at the left brachial artery of 20 healthy adults [55% female, 27.9 years (5.2), 24.2 (2.8) kg/m]. BP of both arms was measured simultaneously. Experimental (left) arm BP was then systematically manipulated by adjusting its position ABOVE (+30°) and BELOW (-30°) heart level in a randomized order following measurement at heart level (0°). The control (right) arm remained at heart level. Six stiffness measurements were calculated: compliance, distensibility, beta-stiffness, and three estimates of pulse wave velocity (PWV) (Bramwell Hill, blood flow, and beta-stiffness). We considered the measurement technique with the least significant change across positions to be the least pressure-dependent. RESULTS: There was a large effect change in mean arterial pressure (np = 0.75, P < 0.001) in the experimental arm when it was ABOVE (Δ-4.4 mmHg) and BELOW (Δ10.4 mmHg) heart level. There was a main effect (P < 0.05) of arm position on all arterial stiffness measures. From least to most pressure-dependent, the arterial stiffness measurements were: PWV (blood flow method), compliance coefficient, beta-stiffness, distensibility coefficient, PWV (Bramwell-Hill method), and PWV (beta-stiffness index method). CONCLUSION: All single-point measures assessed are pressure-dependent. The PWV (blood flow method) may be the least pressure-dependent single-point measure, and may be the most suitable single-point measure to assess local vascular function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)956-963
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Hydrostatic pressure
  • Posture
  • Vascular stiffness
  • Atherosclerosis

Cite this

Zieff, G., Heffernan, K., Stoner, K., Fryer, S., Creduer, D., Hanson, E., ... Stoner, L. (2018). The pressure-dependency of local measures of arterial stiffness. Journal of Hypertension, 37(5), 956-963. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001998
Zieff, Gabriel ; Heffernan, Kevin ; Stoner, Keeron ; Fryer, Simon ; Creduer, Daniel ; Hanson, Erik ; Faulkner, James ; Stoner, Lee. / The pressure-dependency of local measures of arterial stiffness. In: Journal of Hypertension. 2018 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 956-963.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To determine which ultrasound-based, single-point arterial stiffness estimate is least dependent on blood pressure (BP) to improve assessment of local vascular function. METHODS: Ultrasound was used to assess blood flow and diameters at the left brachial artery of 20 healthy adults [55{\%} female, 27.9 years (5.2), 24.2 (2.8) kg/m]. BP of both arms was measured simultaneously. Experimental (left) arm BP was then systematically manipulated by adjusting its position ABOVE (+30°) and BELOW (-30°) heart level in a randomized order following measurement at heart level (0°). The control (right) arm remained at heart level. Six stiffness measurements were calculated: compliance, distensibility, beta-stiffness, and three estimates of pulse wave velocity (PWV) (Bramwell Hill, blood flow, and beta-stiffness). We considered the measurement technique with the least significant change across positions to be the least pressure-dependent. RESULTS: There was a large effect change in mean arterial pressure (np = 0.75, P < 0.001) in the experimental arm when it was ABOVE (Δ-4.4 mmHg) and BELOW (Δ10.4 mmHg) heart level. There was a main effect (P < 0.05) of arm position on all arterial stiffness measures. From least to most pressure-dependent, the arterial stiffness measurements were: PWV (blood flow method), compliance coefficient, beta-stiffness, distensibility coefficient, PWV (Bramwell-Hill method), and PWV (beta-stiffness index method). CONCLUSION: All single-point measures assessed are pressure-dependent. The PWV (blood flow method) may be the least pressure-dependent single-point measure, and may be the most suitable single-point measure to assess local vascular function.",
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Zieff, G, Heffernan, K, Stoner, K, Fryer, S, Creduer, D, Hanson, E, Faulkner, J & Stoner, L 2018, 'The pressure-dependency of local measures of arterial stiffness', Journal of Hypertension, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 956-963. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001998

The pressure-dependency of local measures of arterial stiffness. / Zieff, Gabriel; Heffernan, Kevin; Stoner, Keeron; Fryer, Simon; Creduer, Daniel; Hanson, Erik; Faulkner, James; Stoner, Lee.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 37, No. 5, 13.11.2018, p. 956-963.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The pressure-dependency of local measures of arterial stiffness

AU - Zieff, Gabriel

AU - Heffernan, Kevin

AU - Stoner, Keeron

AU - Fryer, Simon

AU - Creduer, Daniel

AU - Hanson, Erik

AU - Faulkner, James

AU - Stoner, Lee

PY - 2018/11/13

Y1 - 2018/11/13

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine which ultrasound-based, single-point arterial stiffness estimate is least dependent on blood pressure (BP) to improve assessment of local vascular function. METHODS: Ultrasound was used to assess blood flow and diameters at the left brachial artery of 20 healthy adults [55% female, 27.9 years (5.2), 24.2 (2.8) kg/m]. BP of both arms was measured simultaneously. Experimental (left) arm BP was then systematically manipulated by adjusting its position ABOVE (+30°) and BELOW (-30°) heart level in a randomized order following measurement at heart level (0°). The control (right) arm remained at heart level. Six stiffness measurements were calculated: compliance, distensibility, beta-stiffness, and three estimates of pulse wave velocity (PWV) (Bramwell Hill, blood flow, and beta-stiffness). We considered the measurement technique with the least significant change across positions to be the least pressure-dependent. RESULTS: There was a large effect change in mean arterial pressure (np = 0.75, P < 0.001) in the experimental arm when it was ABOVE (Δ-4.4 mmHg) and BELOW (Δ10.4 mmHg) heart level. There was a main effect (P < 0.05) of arm position on all arterial stiffness measures. From least to most pressure-dependent, the arterial stiffness measurements were: PWV (blood flow method), compliance coefficient, beta-stiffness, distensibility coefficient, PWV (Bramwell-Hill method), and PWV (beta-stiffness index method). CONCLUSION: All single-point measures assessed are pressure-dependent. The PWV (blood flow method) may be the least pressure-dependent single-point measure, and may be the most suitable single-point measure to assess local vascular function.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To determine which ultrasound-based, single-point arterial stiffness estimate is least dependent on blood pressure (BP) to improve assessment of local vascular function. METHODS: Ultrasound was used to assess blood flow and diameters at the left brachial artery of 20 healthy adults [55% female, 27.9 years (5.2), 24.2 (2.8) kg/m]. BP of both arms was measured simultaneously. Experimental (left) arm BP was then systematically manipulated by adjusting its position ABOVE (+30°) and BELOW (-30°) heart level in a randomized order following measurement at heart level (0°). The control (right) arm remained at heart level. Six stiffness measurements were calculated: compliance, distensibility, beta-stiffness, and three estimates of pulse wave velocity (PWV) (Bramwell Hill, blood flow, and beta-stiffness). We considered the measurement technique with the least significant change across positions to be the least pressure-dependent. RESULTS: There was a large effect change in mean arterial pressure (np = 0.75, P < 0.001) in the experimental arm when it was ABOVE (Δ-4.4 mmHg) and BELOW (Δ10.4 mmHg) heart level. There was a main effect (P < 0.05) of arm position on all arterial stiffness measures. From least to most pressure-dependent, the arterial stiffness measurements were: PWV (blood flow method), compliance coefficient, beta-stiffness, distensibility coefficient, PWV (Bramwell-Hill method), and PWV (beta-stiffness index method). CONCLUSION: All single-point measures assessed are pressure-dependent. The PWV (blood flow method) may be the least pressure-dependent single-point measure, and may be the most suitable single-point measure to assess local vascular function.

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Hydrostatic pressure

KW - Posture

KW - Vascular stiffness

KW - Atherosclerosis

U2 - 10.1097/HJH.0000000000001998

DO - 10.1097/HJH.0000000000001998

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 956

EP - 963

IS - 5

ER -

Zieff G, Heffernan K, Stoner K, Fryer S, Creduer D, Hanson E et al. The pressure-dependency of local measures of arterial stiffness. Journal of Hypertension. 2018 Nov 13;37(5):956-963. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000001998